June 2017 Articles

6/29/2017

Learn from Everything: A Conversation with Leadership Expert Mark Sanborn

By: Steve Gratz

ThinkstockPhotos-518815488-1.jpgLeadership is key in business and in education. Those of us in education understand the critical importance of the education leader in every school district and school building. While contemplating this blog post, I wanted to focus on the importance of leadership regardless of the industry and your position within that industry. As a result, I decided to reach out to my friend and leadership guru, Mark Sanborn, and ask him a few questions.

Mark and I have been friends since the 1970s and lived together as members of Alpha Zeta fraternity at The Ohio State University. Today, Mark is an international bestselling author and noted expert on leadership, team building, customer service and change. You can learn more about Mark at his website.

During my career, I have had the opportunity to be a personal coach to more than 200 individuals. A vast majority of these individuals have gone on to secure leadership positions, not only in education but also in industry. With the shared passion for leadership, I decided to ask Mark a series of questions on being a leader and leadership. Although the questions I asked Mark are fairly broad, they are transferable to those of us in education.

1. If you were beginning a career today or were still early in your career, what would you do differently? What advice would you give to those in that stage of life today?
Happily, I wouldn’t do anything differently. My strategy those many years ago is valid today: try lots of things. Get as much diverse experience as possible. More often than not, we find our true calling through experience — trial and error — rather than contemplation. You don’t find out which foods you like by thinking about them but by trying them. The same is true with career strengths, likes and dislikes.

2. What is the greatest change you've seen in the workplace since you began your career? Does that change the way you lead today? If so, how? 
The greatest change is the complexity of business and life. We’ve always faced change and challenge, but technology has been one of many factors that has dramatically increased complexity. We are deluged with information. Nobody can know everything there is to know nor even hope to keep completely up to date. That means leaders need a carefully designed learning strategy that includes trusted experts and sources to help fill in the blanks, the things we don’t know.

3. What three words might people use to describe you as a leader? 
The more accurate answer would come from those who have experienced my leadership, but based on feedback I’ve gotten, those descriptors would include erudite, intense and funny. I invest much time in thinking and learning (hence erudite). I’m very focused on what’s important (hence intense). People who don’t know me well would be surprised to find I’m a prankster who finds the humor in almost everything (hence funny).

4. You seem to write a lot about your experiences with others and what you learn from them, such as you did in “The Fred Factor.” What would you hope people most learn from you and your work?
I hope people learn how they can learn from everything they do and observe. That’s how I was able to extract good ideas and lessons from my encounters with my postal carrier Fred Shea. G.K. Chesterton said, “The world will never lack for wonders, only wonder.” If we stay interested, curious and engaged with life, we can keep continually learning and growing.

5. What is the hardest thing you have to do as a leader? What have you learned that has helped you in this area? 
One of the hardest things I’ve done as a leader is let an employee go who was a good person and conscientious employee but not the right fit for the job. The person didn’t have the skills or demeanor to succeed in the role that was required. Employers and employees need to recognize that all jobs are role specific, and being good isn’t enough if the employee isn’t the right person for the job. I’ve learned the importance of clarifying what is needed in a position and to determine if a possible candidate is just a good employee or the right employee for the job.

6. What one business or leadership book would you recommend to young leaders, besides one of your own, to help them in their leadership?
There are many excellent books on leadership, but I’d suggest “Good to Great,” because Jim Collins does a great job of showing how the leadership piece fits into the bigger organizational puzzle. I like his take on Level 5 Leaders and that his book is based on quantitative research.

7. What motivates you personally to get up in the morning? What is it that keeps you pushing for more personally or professionally? How do you continue to find inspiration in life? 
For me, it comes down to faith, family and friends. Those three aren’t the icing on the cake — they are the cake. If you are clear in your beliefs and care for the relationships that matter, the rest follows. After that, I am about combining purpose and profit. Making money is easy, but making money by being of larger service and benefiting others is a blessing. I feel fortunate in my work to be able to do both.

I encourage you to reflect on the questions I asked Mark and think about how you would respond to the questions. This would be a great activity to share with other school leaders in your district.

Dr. Steve Gratz is senior executive director of the Center for Student Support and Education Options at the Ohio Department of Education, where he oversees creative ways to help students in Ohio achieve success in school. You can learn more about Steve by clicking here.

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6/21/2017

GUEST BLOG: Five Tips to Help Educators and Their Students Learn All Summer Long - Emily Rozmus and Erica Clay, INFOhio

By: Guest Blogger

Students who don’t read over the summer are at risk for slipping down the Summer Slide. But students aren’t the only ones who need to keep learning in the summer. Teachers use their summers for intense professional development, often provided by their districts. The summer is the perfect time for teachers and students to explore new areas of interest and personalize their learning. Tip #1: Start your summer learning by exploring resources that are high-quality, easily accessible and allow you to create your own learning goals.

With INFOhio, Ohio’s PreK-12 Digital Library, all Ohio preK-12 educators, students and their parents have free access to fun and engaging learning activities to last all summer long. INFOhio travels with you no matter where you go. From home to the beach, or from daycare to the public library, INFOhio’s resources are available anywhere there is an internet connection. You’ll need to know your INFOhio username and password, but finding your username and password is easy! Visit www.infohio.org/goto/getpassword. Fill out the form and look for the username and password on the result screen. Write your username and password on a sticky note that you keep on your computer or with your device. If school isn’t out yet, print it on INFOhio flyers for parents or on bookmarks for students and send them home on the last day of school. Are your students already out for the year? Use your school’s social media channels to let parents know where they can look up the INFOhio username and password.

Parents can set aside time each day to engage children with learning activities that are challenging and foster creativity. Tip #2: Connect your students and their families to free, engaging, hands-on learning activities that can help close the achievement gap. INFOhio provides free, downloadable "Beach Bags" full of learning activities for children. Beach Bags make it easy for students in grades preK-3 to connect to eBooks, printable Little Books and fun learning activities from INFOhio. Beach Bags guide young learners through INFOhio resources like BookFlix, Early World of Learning, World Book Kids, Science Reference Center and ISearch. In addition to Beach Bags, Camp INFOhio offers a virtual camp with five days of activities to promote science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) learning for students in grades 4-8. If school is already out for you, send a note to caregivers to let them know where they can access the Beach Bags, Camp INFOhio and more on the INFOhio website.

For teachers, "summer is the perfect time to recharge," according to this article from Educational Leadership about ways that being a better student will lead to being a better teacher. Tip #3: Develop your own professional reading plan on a topic that interests you. INFOhio’s 15 for Educators flyer lists leading educational publications available at no cost to Ohio educators through Explora for Educators from INFOhio. Educators can search for specific topics or browse different editions to explore different concepts that may be important to them. To learn more about finding relevant learning materials, see this recent Teach With INFOhio blog post.

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During the summer months, no educator wants to be tied down to a restrictive course schedule to earn their contact hours. Tip #4: Use online learning modules to learn at your own pace. With INFOhio’s Success in Six, learn how to differentiate, teach students important research and information literacy skills, incorporate STEAM in the classroom, read online text closely and find helpful blended learning and 1:1 tools for your students. Each module contains an overview to bring you up to speed on the topic and then guides you to sites and tools to explore more deeply. Modules include activities that let you practice new skills while earning certificates for contact hours. You can complete one or all of the modules in any order. The best part is Success in Six is available at no cost to all educators!

If you like what you have shared with your students and what you are learning in your own summer professional development, don’t keep it to yourself. Tip #5: Pass it on! Share those ideas with colleagues. Encourage them to do the same. It’s a great way to expand your personal learning network. If you are active on social media, use #INFOhioWorks along with #MyOhioClassroom to let colleagues around the state know how you’ll use what you are learning this summer when you go back to school in the fall. You, your students and your personal learning network can have a fun and engaging summer while laying the groundwork to start the next school year, ready to launch!

Emily Rozmus and Erica Clay are instructional team specialists and the bloggers behind Teach With INFOhio. INFOhio, Ohio’s PreK-12 Digital Library, provides free access to educational resources to all Ohio preK-12 schools, serving nearly two million students, their families and their teachers. INFOhio is a division of the Management Council of the Ohio Education Computer Network. To learn more about using INFOhio in and out of the classroom, find us on social media and the Teach With INFOhio blog.

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6/14/2017

There’s More than One Way to Scramble an Egg

By: Virginia Ressa

ThinkstockPhotos-466406260.jpgI like to think of myself as a “lifelong learner,” but my husband keeps finding ways to challenge this notion. Do I really want to learn about classic '70s rock music? I’m fairly sure I could have lived without learning how to tile a foyer — though it did turn out pretty well. A while ago, he was watching cooking shows, finding recipes for “us” to try out. I was game for trying new recipes. I’m a pretty good cook, but my repertoire is definitely limited.

In the course of our mini adventure through cooking shows and new recipes, my husband told me about a video of Gordon Ramsay demonstrating how to make the perfect scrambled egg. Wait. I know how to scramble eggs. I’ve been scrambling eggs since I was a teenager. It’s simple, and there really is just one way to make scrambled eggs…right?

As adults, there are some things we’ve been doing for such a long time or so often that we have come to believe there is just one way to do that task, and we already know how. Teachers often think about their classrooms and instructional practices this way. We know what works, so we keep using the same methods over and over. Once we have found a practice that works well, we recreate it with each group of students with the underlying notion, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” But is your method for teaching addition using buttons as manipulatives the only way to do it? Is it the most effective? What if you talked to other elementary teachers and asked what their best practices are? Maybe there’s another method that might also work well?

I eventually acquiesced and agreed to watch the video on scrambling eggs. I found out that there are, indeed, other ways to scramble eggs. There was Chef Ramsay using a pot instead of a nonstick frying pan. He had a spatula but not the flat kind I use to make eggs; he used the rubber kind that I mix things with. The most surprising part of his technique was the addition of crème fraiche. I was incredulous — I had never heard of anyone making eggs this way. I immediately got out the eggs, butter, a small pot, the spatula that Ramsay said to use and a container of sour cream (turned out I was all out of crème fraiche). I don’t know if I had set out to prove Ramsay wrong or if I was really intrigued about a new way of scrambling eggs. Of course, the eggs were really good. Light and fluffy, with a bit of a rich flavor added by the sour cream. Not only was Ramsay right, so was my husband. I had to swallow my pride and admit that there is more than one way to scramble an egg. Now, almost every Sunday, I make really good scrambled eggs for our brunch. I’ve experimented with some variations, like sour cream, and have found some small changes that work for me. I’m just confident enough to think I can improve on what Ramsay does.

When we think about our personal and professional lives, there are probably dozens of these types of everyday things we do that we would never consider doing differently. We have routines that we build into our classroom expectations because we think they work well. How do you help students get ready to leave the classroom? Do they wait at their desks for the bell? Do you have them line up along the tape on the floor? Here is a video from a teacher who uses music to focus her students on lining up for lunch. This is probably much more effective than the rush of middle schoolers I had waiting to push the door open and run to the lunchroom. Beyond classroom management, we also become comfortable with how we teach content. How do you teach the basic concepts of your subject area? Do you use a set of graphic organizers every year? Could you integrate technology to make the use of graphic organizers more effective? My point is simply that there are always other techniques to consider. Find out what your colleagues are doing. Check out the Teaching Channel for videos of all types of classroom practices. Take time to think about the teaching and learning happening in your classroom and how you might experiment with new ways of doing things that have become accepted practice.

If we are going to profess the benefits of being lifelong learners to our students, we need to be willing to be lifelong learners as well. I rewatched Ramsay’s video this morning and saw that it has more than 22 million views. Maybe we have more lifelong learners in our midst than I thought. In case you are feeling the need to learn how to do something differently, here’s an article from The New York Times with a series of videos about how to wash your hair. Yes, there is more than one way to wash your hair.  

Virginia Ressa is an education program specialist at the Ohio Department of Education, where she focuses on helping schools and educators meet the needs of diverse learners through professional learning. You can learn more about Virginia by clicking here.

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6/2/2017

Superintendent's Blog: STEM Students Offer Solutions to the Opioid Crisis

By: Paolo DeMaria

Last fall, I invited Ohio’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students to join the conversation about one of the biggest problems facing our state — the opioid crisis. I worked with the Ohio STEM Learning Network to issue a design challenge for students. I asked them to come up with innovative solutions to opioid abuse in our state. I know that Ohio’s youth are a great source of creativity and brilliance. So, I was not surprised when more than 1,200 students responded to the challenge and came up with hundreds of possible solutions.

On May 18, Battelle hosted the Opioid Solutions Showcase, where some of the best ideas were shared. These included a pill bottle that could be programmed to limit medication doses and an app that allowed concerned family members to track the whereabouts of a person struggling with addiction. I was really inspired by these young people. In the video, I interviewed a student team from the Dayton STEM Academy. The team created a piece of legislation that addresses the opioid crisis. The project is a fantastic example of how STEM education is so much more than rigorous coursework in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. It is actually about project-based learning that allows kids to apply the skills they learn from a variety of classes to real-world problems.

Paolo DeMaria is superintendent of public instruction of Ohio, where he works to support an education system of nearly 3,600 public schools and more than 1.6 million students.

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