GUEST BLOG: Empowering Today’s Girls to Become Tomorrow’s Leaders — Stephanie L. Patton, Columbus City Schools

3/22/2017

By: Guest Blogger

Editor’s Note: March is Women’s History Month. In honor of this month, we invited Stephanie Patton to reflect on her experience as an administrator of a public, all-girls school.

Stephanie-Patton-small-4.pngThe day I received a call with an invitation to lead my district’s all-girl middle school, there was a hint of surprise followed by a little hesitation. An all-girl middle school, I thought to myself, what an interesting concept. Having years of experience teaching and more than a decade of experience as an administrator in dual gender settings, it should be no big deal, right? I have educated girls my whole career.

What I have learned is that there is a difference between providing an education for girls and how girls learn. In a single gender setting, the strengths and weakness of how girls thrive in an educational environment are magnified. I now understand the complexity of a woman begins in the preteen years, followed by adolescence and young adulthood. Some days, to my exhaustion, I learn. Girls want to be heard, girls want to be seen and girls want to be perfect. I want my girls to have a voice, I want my girls to break the glass ceiling while everyone is watching and I want my girls to be brave—not perfect. This is easier said than done. How do you build up a girl to be confident when society lays her foundation as beauty and image through outlets of social media and where self-worth and value are placed on how many likes you get on Instagram?

Creating a nurturing environment that empowers young girls to love the skin they’re in, recognize their own voices and lead by example is what we are striving for in our school. Having a strong advisory program where everyday challenges can be discussed, along with strategies on how to overcome them is central to how we start each day. We also partake in yoga and meditation, so we can self-reflect, focus and de-escalate all of life’s stressors.

As women, we share many key roles that require balance such as wives, mothers, professionals and entrepreneurs. We are strong contributors to the world. If we don’t instill this reality in our youth, we are not doing our job as educators. Now I know the question will be, what about academics? And I say, you should see a classroom where girls are empowered to raise their hands and express their intellect with confidence. What a sight to see where girls are leaders in science, math and technology. You ask my students what careers they are interested in and they will tell you everything from a forensic scientist or marine biologist to an attorney or philanthropist. The difference, I have learned, is that they see power in their futures as females, outside of a male-dominated world. Not as an isolated experience, as a different experience that is made up of equals. The first graduating class of our middle school will be graduating high school this year, and I can’t wait to see what awaits them. Data has shown that they have fared well among their peers in high school—single or dual gender.

As we embark on Women’s History Month, we are focusing on women who are the unsung heroes, women who have made strides and contributions to society with little fanfare. The emphasis is on average, everyday women who are brave, who have a voice and who have made a difference in society. The women they see within themselves.

Stephanie L. Patton is principal of Columbus City Preparatory School for Girls in Columbus City Schools, a school committed to cultivating a challenging and enriching educational environment that encourages every girl to reach her full potential. You can contact Stephanie by clicking here.

Pam Reed
Stephanie Patton is the real deal. I am a teacher at CCPSG and because of her leadership and guidance in making CCPSG a high-quality learning environment, I send my daughters there as well. She pushes teachers to facilitate challenging and thought-provoking lessons while nurturing the whole child. Her writing provides insight into our daily goal; creating strong, empowered women.
3/24/2017 5:14:31 PM

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