Blog Post Category:

2/22/2019

Superintendent for a Day… Leader for a Lifetime!

By: Staff Blogger

As students prepare for the next steps on their learning journeys, Ohio Department of Education staff members are always thrilled to hear how these plans will help others, positively impact their peers and shape the future of our state. One central Ohio student’s career aspirations will certainly shape education, but from a position that may not be on typical high school senior’s radar. Andrew Knox’s goal is to become the state superintendent of public instruction.

Andrew reached out to State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria to share that the Department was a planned stop on his career path, so he may fill Ohio’s top seat in education and one day become the state superintendent. On Feb. 20, Andrew took one step closer to his ultimate career goal when he reported for duty at the Ohio Department of Education and assumed the ceremonial role of state superintendent for the day.

Andrew’s resume certainly is not limited to his single day tenure as state superintendent. As a student at the Ohio School for the Deaf, Andrew already has made a profound impact to address the challenges faced by Deaf Ohioans and is an advocate for shaping the ways in which these areas can be addressed. Prior to serving as Ohio’s state schools chief, Andrew helped change the course of state history with his contributing efforts to support the passage of legislation in 2017 to declare Ohio Deaf History Month (March 13-April 15).

Much like Superintendent DeMaria encounters daily, Andrew kept a full calendar of connections with partners to continue strengthening the learning opportunities for Ohio’s 1.7 million K-12 students. From meetings with other state agency directors and members of the governor’s cabinet to sharing his positions on policy during a mock interview with a Columbus Dispatch reporter to lobbying for additional funding for early literacy education for Deaf students, Andrew’s critical thinking, creativity and collaboration skills were on full display.

Our team extends gratitude to Andrew for sharing his ideas, inspiring our work and spending the day with us at the Ohio Department of Education. Follow Andrew’s entire day below through Superintendent DeMaria’s Twitter feed!

Leave a Comment
2/18/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Celebrates Presidents’ Day

By: Staff Blogger

Hail to the (state education) chief! Presidents’ Day is the perfect day to take a step back in time and celebrate Ohio’s connection to our country’s highest office. State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria did just that through the eyes of Rutherford B. Hayes. Visiting locations throughout central Ohio with historical significance to the 19th president, Superintendent DeMaria reprised the role of Hayes to recognize the contributions of the former commander in chief, congressman and Ohio governor. From visits to the Ohio Statehouse to The Ohio State University, follow along with Superintendent DeMaria as he lives history!

Leave a Comment
2/15/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits Upper Valley Career Center

By: Staff Blogger

Ohio’s career and technical education programs give students incredible options for college and rewarding careers. As part of Career Tech Month, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria joined State Board member Mike Toal to visit the Upper Valley Career Center in Piqua. Passion for career tech was paramount from parents, students and educators during the visit. Students are prepared for success in college, advanced training and the workforce thanks to the Upper Valley instructional team.

Leave a Comment
2/15/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits the Dayton Regional STEM School

By: Staff Blogger

A sign hanging in the Dayton Regional STEM School says, “The Real World Starts Here.” This approach to teaching and preparing students for success in a global economy is what drives the school’s culture of continuous improvement and innovative educational experiences. Two Dayton STEM students led State Board of Education Vice President Charlotte McGuire and State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria on a tour of their dynamic teaching and learning community. Students are empowered to take ownership of their learning through the principles of STEM education, engaging instructional strategies, project-based learning and career exploration.

Leave a Comment
2/14/2019

Educator Talent and Experience… Why It Matters and How to Build Upon It

By: Julia Simmerer

Editor’s Note: Cheryl Krohn helped author this blog. Cheryl is the strategic administrator in the Department’s Center for Teaching, Leading and Learning. You can contact Cheryl here.

GettyImages-476719889.jpgImagine a student who, year after year, has teachers in their first year of teaching. Novice teachers often are less effective than their more experienced peers, which can negatively impact outcomes for students. This impact compounds when students repeatedly have inexperienced teachers. Ohio’s students of color and economically disadvantaged students are twice as likely as other students to have first- or second-year teachers. This is one example of the inequity that many Ohio students experience and the Department addresses in Ohio’s 2015 Educator Equity Plan.

Ohio’s strategic plan for education, Each Child, Our Future, defines equity as ensuring “each child has access to relevant and challenging academic experiences and educational resources necessary for success across race, gender, ethnicity, language, disability, family background and/or income.” Every school day, we want students throughout Ohio to have educators who challenge, prepare and empower them. All school staff members have the ability to positively impact students’ learning experiences, but — as the strategic plan notes — “highly effective teachers and instructional practices are at the heart of student learning.”

To help schools and districts address equity gaps and other challenges, Each Child, Our Future emphasizes a shift in policy and practice to focus on supports and services for students. One key to ensuring each child has equitable access to excellent educators is to systematically change the way we engage in human capital management. Human capital is the value employees bring to an organization because of their knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences. Schools and districts need to reimagine human capital practices to help build the educator talent in schools to meet each student’s needs. This requires recognizing that the responsibility for human capital in schools goes beyond the human resources office to seeing it as a central function of the system at many levels. It also means moving beyond the isolated policies and actions to a comprehensive approach of attracting and keeping educator talent. The Center for Teaching, Leading and Learning is deepening its support to schools and districts in this area by launching a new website, The Human Capital Resource Center.

Resources to attract, hire and support excellent educators in Ohio
The Human Capital Resource Center website helps schools and districts establish comprehensive approaches to human capital management and includes a variety of tools to help schools make decisions about attracting, hiring and supporting excellent educators. To explore the resources and learn more, visit www.ohiohcrc.org.
 
The Ohio Human Capital Resource Center highlights four key areas:

  1. Attract & Prepare helps fill Ohio’s pipeline of future educators with people who are properly prepared for the realities and rewards of the profession. There is a focus on exploring careers in education.
  2. Recruit & Hire refines schools’ and districts’ recruitment and hiring practices to address current and future staffing needs, so each child in Ohio has excellent educators. Here the focus is on educator recruitment.
  3. Support & Grow recommends ways that school and district leaders can develop and manage talent. The focus is on mentoring for all educators and supporting educator professional conduct.
  4. Engage & Reward shares strategies for establishing a culture that engages stakeholder voices, maintains transparency, fosters collaboration and recognizes exemplary service — all of which improve recruitment and retention. Here the focus is on educator recognition.

The Human Capital Resource Center will continue to expand and evolve to provide more resources that support schools’ and districts’ efforts to ensure each child has access to excellent educators.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching, Leading and Learning at the Ohio Department of Education. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

Leave a Comment
2/14/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Attends OETC

By: Staff Blogger

Tech marks the spot at this year’s Ohio Educational Technology Conference. Each year thousands of education technology professionals, teachers and curriculum directors attend the conference, known as OETC, to advance the teaching and learning in Ohio’s classrooms. Using technology as a tool to enhance and differentiate instruction, attendees learn new ways to help students explore, think critically and meet their learning goals. State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria provided welcoming remarks on day 2 of the three-day event, and connected with attendees and education partners.

Leave a Comment
2/14/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits South-Western Career Academy

By: Staff Blogger

“Start your plan here!” This is the message South-Western Career Academy educators share with students as they explore their many options after high school. February is Career and Technical Education Month and State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria visited the South-Western City Schools to learn about the exciting ways the district prepares students for success. Career certifications, postsecondary credit and valuable in-demand skills are the cornerstones to the district’s career tech programs and instructional leaders showcased the many ways in which students are ready to explore a host of future possibilities.  

Leave a Comment
2/11/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits J.F. Dulles Elementary School

By: Staff Blogger

Increasing the number of highly effective teachers and leaders is one of 10 strategies set forth in Each Child, Our Future – Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education. The educators at John Foster Dulles Elementary personify this strategy with their exceptional commitment to students and social-emotional learning. Supporting the whole child is at the center of Each Child, Our Future and at the heart of this learning community’s culture of caring. Dulles was named a 2018 National Blue Ribbon School for their focus on continuous improvement and preparing all students for success. In addition, the U.S. Department of Education presented Elizabeth Riesenberger, Dulles Elementary principal, with the Terrel H. Bell award for outstanding leadership. State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria visited the Oak Hills Local School District in Cincinnati on Feb. 8 to see the incredible learning connections Dulles Elementary educators create for students.

Leave a Comment
2/11/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits Sycamore High School

By: Staff Blogger

For Sycamore High School students, it’s more than innovation. It’s Synnovation. The school’s Synnovation Lab shifted away from a traditional bell schedule so that students are able to set a pace that works best for their individual learning styles. With its dynamic approach to personalized learning, students are empowered to take ownership of their instruction and challenged to take responsibility for when they master a concept and are ready to advance to the next area. Sycamore sophomores Isabel and Jake personally invited State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria to see their school in action. The students showcased Sycamore’s points of pride on Feb. 8 during Superintendent DeMaria’s visit.

Leave a Comment
2/7/2019

GUEST BLOG: No Matter the Pathway, A Career is the Goal — Dr. Joyce Malainy, Career and Technology Education Centers

By: Guest Blogger

GettyImages-896458438.jpgIt is hard to believe that January 2019 is already at a close. As we all know, it seems the more “experienced” we become, the faster time moves. Now February is upon us. February is a big deal at the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County because February is Career and Technical Education Month. Career and Technical Education Month is a national public awareness initiative created to highlight and celebrate the accomplishments and recognize the value of career-technical education programs across the nation.

Here in Licking County, the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County (formerly Licking County Joint Vocational School) have more than 40 years of experience working to meet the needs of students, schools, and business and industry partners to create, educate and maintain a workforce that can meet the needs of the day. From the beginning, we have understood that one of the greatest values in career-technical education is working with business and industry leaders to ensure we understand their workforce needs, and they understand the role career-technical education plays in readying their future workforce.

The way we accomplish this understanding has evolved over the decades. One of the more recent innovations is through the expansion of middle school career-technical education programming. Through our middle school career exploration programs, we are beginning to help students at a younger age think about potential careers and understand the necessary educational pathways that lead to the careers of their choice. Currently, we have seven such programs in middle schools throughout Licking County, with more on the way. Additionally, we have provided professional development resources for the career exploration programs to all our Licking County middle school staff members. This makes Licking County a true leader in this initiative. Adding middle school career studies is one more way we provide career opportunities to Licking County beyond those already available in our high school and adult centers. This latest step is just another move in that evolving journey.

However, with all that career-tech centers and other institutions are doing to fill the skills gap and prepare tomorrow’s workforce, there always are opportunities for continued growth. The good news…there are solutions to these issues. We can do better at preparing our students for what is ahead just by making them and their families aware of all options and pathways. Those available to students still in secondary school and those who have entered the “adult” world who need more training and skills. We just need to open ourselves to an honest discussion, let go of the traditions and education strategies we consider off limits and above reproach and focus on the students and helping them find their true pursuits. 

At the end of the day, our diplomas, Advanced Placement credits or acceptance letters to four-year colleges cannot define success. We must define success for today's students by focusing on careers. That is where every pathway leads, anyhow.

Dr. Joyce Malainy is the superintendent of the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County. You can contact her at jmalainy@c-tec.edu.

Leave a Comment
Displaying results 71-80 (of 191)
 |<  <  4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13  >  >| 

Last Modified: 5/17/2019 3:20:37 PM