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4/16/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Attends the 67th Annual SkillsUSA Ohio State Championships

By: Staff Blogger

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4/4/2019

GUEST BLOG: Defining My Education as a Career-Tech Student With College Plans (and Perfect Test Scores) — Dinah Ward, Canton South High School

By: Guest Blogger

GettyImages-904115232.jpgSenior year of high school is a unique, awkward transition; you’ve outgrown high school, yet you’re not even close to being ready for the amazing opportunities the future will bring. It is on this threshold that I now stand. The possibilities of the future have become a reality, and my senior year has been more than I could have ever expected. I have worked harder in these past eight months than I ever have before, and it has definitely paid off.

As a student, I have always planned to go to college, but that never stopped me from enrolling in a career-technical program to enrich my educational experience. The two-year graphic design class has become one of my all-time favorites due to its unique structure and non-traditional approach to art education. The time a student spends in high school no longer has to be focused solely on traditional academic pursuits. Today, many traditional high schools, like my own, Canton South, offer career-oriented programs in addition to typical academic courses. During my last year as a high school student, I have found great successes academically, competitively and, most importantly, I have found my future.

In December of 2018, I received my scores from the ACT, SAT and SAT English Subject Test. They were 36, 1600 and 800 respectively — all perfect scores. These results were more than I could have ever hoped to receive, but everything I had worked for. I spent hours each day doing homework from my many Advanced Placement and College Credit Plus classes, only to spend hours more on test prep. I felt as if I could actually be a competitive applicant to Ivy League institutions because of my scores. They even helped me earn a full ride to The Ohio State University. I also applied to Stanford, Princeton, Cornell, Barnard and Columbia. I plan on attending Barnard in the fall to major in English. Since this subject has always been close to my heart, I want to pursue a career in publishing. Although this may not appear to be related to my career-tech program, there is value in courses that teach professional skills.

However hard I have worked to excel in my academic pursuits, I have worked equally hard in my career-tech program. My participation in the graphic design career-technical program led me to a third-place finish in the state Business Professionals of America competition in digital publishing. This earned me a place in the national competition. Although I have chosen to pursue higher education rather than going directly into a career, my career-tech program has become central to my high school experience. Many opportunities I would not otherwise have had, have been available to me through this class. Not only has it made me a more competitive applicant, but graphic design also has taught me many things about the professional world. I have learned to be a better communicator, interviewee and, most importantly, graphic designer.

I stand now at the threshold to the next chapter in my life. As a prospective college student, it was extremely hard to maintain the motivation that built me a competitive application. Without the support I received from my friends, family and teachers, I know I would not be in the position I am today. Throughout my journey in high school, it was hard for me to decide what college, let alone what career, was best for me. It was only at the beginning of my senior year that I actually started researching colleges and working to achieve my goals. Although I was able to achieve my goals, it often felt like there was not enough time to fulfill my expectations. My senior year in high school was, by far, my favorite; from competitions to test scores to college decisions, every experience has helped prepare me for my future. I only wish I had started preparing sooner.

Dinah Ward is a high school senior at Canton South High School. After graduation, she plans to study English at Barnard College so she can pursue a career in publishing.

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3/15/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Attends Ohio DECA’s Career Development Conference

By: Staff Blogger

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3/15/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Attends the State Leadership Conference for the Business Professionals of America-Ohio Association

By: Staff Blogger

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2/22/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Celebrates Career Tech Month

By: Staff Blogger

Every Ohio student is on a unique path to greatness. One of the key strategies in Each Child, Our Future – Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education – details the importance of a rich and meaningful high school experience. This strategy discusses giving students multiple ways to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed for every avenue after high school. Ohio’s career and technical education programs are essential to providing these hands-on learning experiences for students. State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria celebrated Career Tech Month with visits to three Career Tech centers on Feb. 22 — Swiss Hills Career Center, Belmont-Harrison Career Center and C-TEC of Licking County. Each stop featured exemplary educators, excited and engaged learners and impactful business and industry partners. At C-TEC, Superintendent DeMaria moderated a panel discussion with students and a teacher to hear success stories of how the school prepares students for college, advanced training and the workforce. Follow along below with highlights from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

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2/15/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits Upper Valley Career Center

By: Staff Blogger

Ohio’s career and technical education programs give students incredible options for college and rewarding careers. As part of Career Tech Month, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria joined State Board member Mike Toal to visit the Upper Valley Career Center in Piqua. Passion for career tech was paramount from parents, students and educators during the visit. Students are prepared for success in college, advanced training and the workforce thanks to the Upper Valley instructional team.

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2/14/2019

State Supt. Paolo DeMaria Visits South-Western Career Academy

By: Staff Blogger

“Start your plan here!” This is the message South-Western Career Academy educators share with students as they explore their many options after high school. February is Career and Technical Education Month and State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria visited the South-Western City Schools to learn about the exciting ways the district prepares students for success. Career certifications, postsecondary credit and valuable in-demand skills are the cornerstones to the district’s career tech programs and instructional leaders showcased the many ways in which students are ready to explore a host of future possibilities.  

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2/7/2019

GUEST BLOG: No Matter the Pathway, A Career is the Goal — Dr. Joyce Malainy, Career and Technology Education Centers

By: Guest Blogger

GettyImages-896458438.jpgIt is hard to believe that January 2019 is already at a close. As we all know, it seems the more “experienced” we become, the faster time moves. Now February is upon us. February is a big deal at the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County because February is Career and Technical Education Month. Career and Technical Education Month is a national public awareness initiative created to highlight and celebrate the accomplishments and recognize the value of career-technical education programs across the nation.

Here in Licking County, the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County (formerly Licking County Joint Vocational School) have more than 40 years of experience working to meet the needs of students, schools, and business and industry partners to create, educate and maintain a workforce that can meet the needs of the day. From the beginning, we have understood that one of the greatest values in career-technical education is working with business and industry leaders to ensure we understand their workforce needs, and they understand the role career-technical education plays in readying their future workforce.

The way we accomplish this understanding has evolved over the decades. One of the more recent innovations is through the expansion of middle school career-technical education programming. Through our middle school career exploration programs, we are beginning to help students at a younger age think about potential careers and understand the necessary educational pathways that lead to the careers of their choice. Currently, we have seven such programs in middle schools throughout Licking County, with more on the way. Additionally, we have provided professional development resources for the career exploration programs to all our Licking County middle school staff members. This makes Licking County a true leader in this initiative. Adding middle school career studies is one more way we provide career opportunities to Licking County beyond those already available in our high school and adult centers. This latest step is just another move in that evolving journey.

However, with all that career-tech centers and other institutions are doing to fill the skills gap and prepare tomorrow’s workforce, there always are opportunities for continued growth. The good news…there are solutions to these issues. We can do better at preparing our students for what is ahead just by making them and their families aware of all options and pathways. Those available to students still in secondary school and those who have entered the “adult” world who need more training and skills. We just need to open ourselves to an honest discussion, let go of the traditions and education strategies we consider off limits and above reproach and focus on the students and helping them find their true pursuits. 

At the end of the day, our diplomas, Advanced Placement credits or acceptance letters to four-year colleges cannot define success. We must define success for today's students by focusing on careers. That is where every pathway leads, anyhow.

Dr. Joyce Malainy is the superintendent of the Career and Technology Education Centers of Licking County. You can contact her at jmalainy@c-tec.edu.

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11/15/2018

National Apprenticeship Week...A Fresh Look at a Classic Career Path

By: Steve Gratz

GettyImages-878440230.jpgNational Apprenticeship Week is a national celebration that offers leaders in business, labor, education and other critical partners a chance to demonstrate their support for apprenticeship. Gov. Kasich proclaimed Nov. 12-18, 2018, as National Apprenticeship Week in Ohio.

National Apprenticeship Week gives apprenticeship sponsors the opportunity to showcase their programs, facilities and apprentices in their community. The weeklong event highlights the benefits of apprenticeship in preparing a highly skilled workforce to meet the talent needs of employers across diverse industries. We’re seeing a resurgence of pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship opportunities across Ohio and the nation. Once considered a secondhand career path, today, pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs are providing excellent pay and benefits. Many apprenticeship programs provide a salary of $30,000 or more with full benefits throughout the training program. On average, apprentices who complete their training programs earn $60,000 or more per year after graduation. You can learn more about apprenticeships by visiting ApprenticeOhio.

There are 19 National Apprenticeship Week events in Ohio this year. Most events are centered around apprenticeships in advanced manufacturing and construction. For example, the Toledo Electrical Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee is hosting an event to bring awareness to SkillsUSA. SkillsUSA is a national membership association serving high school, college and middle school students who are preparing for careers in trade, technical and skilled service occupations. Schools can participate in SkillsUSA and have students compete at the regional level. The event also includes information about the Toledo Electrical Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee and the programs offered, along with a tour of the campus.

Near my hometown of Bluffton in Allen County, GROB Systems, Inc., is hosting an open house for individuals interested in advanced manufacturing. GROB is a family-owned company and has been a leader in designing and building highly innovative production and automation systems. GROB has apprenticeship opportunities for individuals interested in manufacturing, computer numerical control, robotics, automation, machining and engineering. The company will hold an informational presentation describing the program in depth with a question and answer session to follow. After the presentation, GROB apprentices will take attendees on a tour of the very clean, state of the art, highly technical and temperature-controlled facility. Apprentices at GROB gain hands-on knowledge, a great hourly wage, a free associate degree from Rhodes State College, free health, vision and dental insurance, and a 401k match.

Ohio has many pre-apprenticeship programs that partner with companies like the Toledo Electrical Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee and GROB. Some of the most successful programs are located at Miami Valley Career Technical Center and Upper Valley Career Center. You can learn more about Ohio’s effort in establishing pre-apprenticeship programs by visiting the Ohio Department of Education’s webpage on apprenticeships and internships.

Dr. Steve Gratz is senior executive director of the Center for Student Support and Education Options at the Ohio Department of Education, where he oversees creative ways to help students in Ohio achieve success in school. You can learn more about Steve by clicking here.

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9/21/2018

GUEST BLOG: Career-Technical School Finds Innovative Way to Encourage Student Attendance — Jon Weidlich, Great Oaks Career Campuses

By: Guest Blogger

Editor's Note: September is Attendance Awareness Month. A few weeks ago, staff blogger Brittany Miracle shared tips for districts to improve attendance in their schools. This week, we hear from a career center that recognized the importance of student attendance and created a program to improve attendance.

Play-21-A.jpgTwenty-one days — the amount of time research shows a person needs to establish a new habit. That’s the foundation of a strategy to improve student attendance at Scarlet Oaks Career Campus in Cincinnati.

Scarlet Oaks launched Play 21 in 2017 to help students be more accountable for attending school consistently. The concept is simple; students sign a chart in their first and second period classes and when they’ve reached 21 consecutive days of attendance, they can enter a drawing for prizes. Posters around campus serve as reminders of the program.

At the end of the quarter, prizes are awarded to 21 students whose names are drawn. The prizes are relatively small: $10 gift cards, special parking privileges or early release to lunch, for instance. Recognition, though, is a real motivator. The school posts the winners’ names on video monitors throughout the campus.

Through Play 21:

  • Students can see their progress each day and know when they’re reaching the 21-day goal;
  • Students who falter—who miss a day during that period—can start over and still succeed during any given academic quarter;
  • Students who win prizes get public recognition for their success;
  • Students develop new habits.

“We’re trying to change the culture from punitive to positive,” said English instructor Stephen Tracy.  That is, instead of focusing on punishing those who miss school, the Scarlet Oaks staff celebrates those who attend regularly. 

The Scarlet Oaks Attendance Committee, comprised of a group of instructors (both academic and career technical), administrators, a counselor, a custodian and a cybrarian (librarian), wanted to eliminate the mindset that schools take for granted that students will attend. “Some of our students have barriers they have to overcome just to get to school in the morning,” said Roger Osborne, an exercise science instructor.

Osborne said Play 21 helps to provide an incentive for students to give extra effort. One student, for instance, missed the school bus but paid for an Uber ride to get to school on time.

And though Play 21 resulted in 10 students having perfect attendance in 2017-2018, that’s not necessarily the only goal. “We’re recognizing good, improved AND perfect attendance to school,” said Assistant Dean Ramona Beck.

Play 21 takes a holistic approach to attendance, combining student responsibility, teacher encouragement and administrative support. “The sign-in sheet is a daily check for both the teacher and student,” Beck said.

The hope is that, in just 21 days, students are developing good habits for a lifetime.

“They’ll be going to work when they leave us,” said Osborne. “We’ve got to get them ready. This aligns with our mission of preparing students for real life.”

Jon Weidlich is director of Community Relations at Great Oaks Career Campuses in Southwest Ohio. He has worked with and written about students of all ages, as well as schools, parents and communities for more than 25 years. Contact him at weidlicj@greatoaks.com.

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Last Modified: 5/17/2019 3:20:37 PM