Blog Post Category:

9/22/2016

Recognizing the Ohio Teacher of the Year — The Process and More About the Winner

By: Julia Simmerer

Video produced by Pickaway Ross Career & Technology Center students in honor of 2017 Teacher of the Year Dustin Weaver.

Every year, Ohio recognizes one of its own educators with the distinguished Ohio Teacher of the Year award. The mission of the Ohio Teacher of the Year program is to honor, promote and celebrate excellence in teaching and the teaching profession. We recognize and utilize this network of exemplary teachers as leaders in school improvement initiatives and the recruitment, preparation and retention of quality teachers. We also invite our Teacher of the Year to apply for the National Teacher of the Year Award as Ohio’s recognized candidate.

I had the great privilege of working with the selection committee for the 2017 Ohio Teacher of the Year award by both reviewing applications as well as taking part in live interviews. Our committee reviewed many fine candidates for this year’s award, and the decision to grant this prestigious award to just one candidate was not an easy one to make. However, after a rigorous application and interview process, I am pleased to announce that we have made our decision:

The 2017 Ohio Teacher of the Year is Dustin Weaver of Chillicothe High School.

Mr. Weaver has 10 years of experience teaching Integrated Language Arts to high school students. Four years ago, he returned to his alma mater, Chillicothe High School, to reconnect and assist with “fixing a plethora of problems” in the community that affect all children. To this end, his accomplishments are vast. For example, Mr. Weaver was recognized for his role with a grant for Chillicothe Cadets — a $38,000 a year award focused on developing self-esteem, interpersonal and professional skills, and connections to school and community by securing employment at local organizations for students who might otherwise drop out of school. He also is currently collaborating with Ohio University – Chillicothe to modify methods classes with the end goal of improving retention of new teachers. I encourage you to continue reading about his other accomplishments by viewing his bio here.

The selection process Mr. Weaver navigated to become Ohio’s Teacher of the Year is rigorous indeed. Every school district in Ohio that wishes to participate may nominate a single candidate. These candidates are then reviewed by the member of the State Board of Education who represents the educational district from which the candidate is nominated. Only one candidate from each of these 11 State Board of Education districts is selected and asked to complete a written application. Based on these applications, the selection committee I served on invited only five finalists for live interviews.

In his interview, Mr. Weaver stood out immediately. The positive energy he brought to us by engaging and listening to each of his interviewers was contagious. One of the first things he did when he entered the room was move his chair aside and conduct the interview actively moving about the room. He was clearly passionate when he described his work with students during lunch and planning periods to focus on improving aptitude and ability for college entrance exams. The way he spoke effectively expressed how much he enjoyed working in the English lab he created to close the achievement gap for struggling students.

The selection committee I served on included representation from educational service centers, State Board of Education members, teacher unions, retired teachers and former Ohio Teacher of the Year awardees. I cannot express enough the sincere pleasure I received from getting to know so many fantastic educators during this selection process. Even though our committee could only select one teacher of the year, I can report to you that we have many other teachers in our great state who also are providing absolutely excellent services to the students of Ohio.

I encourage you to read more about Mr. Weaver and the other State Board district Teachers of the Year as their stories are truly inspirational.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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12/14/2016

Recognizing Educator Success on Ohio’s Resident Educator Summative Assessment

By: Julia Simmerer

State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria congratulates the educators who finished with the top 100 scores on Ohio’s Resident Educator Summative Assessment.

State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria congratulates the educators who finished with the top 100 scores on Ohio’s Resident Educator Summative Assessment.

This fall, I had the pleasure of attending, along with nearly 300 other guests, an event at the Ohio Statehouse to honor the educators who finished with the top 100 scores on Ohio’s Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) in each of the last 3 years. The event was hosted by Educopia, Ohio’s partner in developing and administering the RESA, and featured a string quartet from Dublin Jerome High School, refreshments and the opportunity for attendees to get to know fellow educators and administrators from all across Ohio.

So, what is the RESA? Successful completion of the assessment has been a requirement for all of Ohio’s Resident Educators seeking professional licensure in Ohio since 2013. In addition to required mentoring activities with experienced educators, this performance-based program includes four tasks that include submitting videos, lesson plans and student work from their classroom instruction. Successful completion is no small feat, as RESA tasks are less ‘busywork’ and more designed to capture and showcase the essential skills that make effective educators prepared for leadership in Ohio’s schools.

Congratulatory remarks were offered by distinguished guests that included State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria, Ohio Representative Andrew Brenner, national education policy expert and author Charlotte Danielson and Educopia CEO Mark Atkinson. The recognized teachers beamed with pride and graciously accepted this acknowledgment for their dedication to the teaching profession and Ohio’s children.  Following formal remarks, it was great to see the speakers and awardees discussing the program, networking and posing for pictures.

It was inspiring to gather with this truly select group of teachers — they worked so diligently to become the top performers out of nearly 16,000 teachers who have taken the RESA since 2013. It was clear to those in attendance that the best is yet to come from this dedicated group of Ohio educators and classrooms will benefit from their efforts for decades to come!

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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2/16/2017

Ensuring Student Safety: Understanding Ohio’s Background Checks

By: Julia Simmerer

The vision of the Department’s Center for the Teaching Profession is that all students have access to qualified, effective educators in safe, nurturing learning environments. Requiring our licensed educators to submit to regular background checks is one of ways we can help ensure Ohio’s educators share that vision.

Our Office of Professional Conduct frequently receives questions about Ohio’s background check requirements for licensed educators. Navigating through statutory requirements can be tedious and does not always provide practical guidance. Licensed educators and those applying for a license for the first time want to know what background checks they need to complete and when they are required.

Before getting into the requirements, it may be helpful to define the different types of background checks. By background checks, we simply mean a fingerprint check. Fingerprints are forwarded to the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI) for processing, where they look at the applicant’s criminal history in Ohio. This is commonly referred to as a BCI check. BCI then forwards the fingerprints to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to check a person’s criminal history in all 50 states. This is commonly referred to as a FBI check.

The type(s) of fingerprint check(s) required is determined by whether the person is an initial applicant, renewing a license or permanent license holder.

Initial Applicants

A person applying for an initial license must complete both the BCI and FBI checks at the time the application is made. The checks must be no older than 365 days at the time they are used for initial licensure.

Renewing a License

Those renewing a license are only required to have an updated FBI check every five years, as long as the following two conditions are met: the person has previously completed a BCI check and the person has lived in Ohio for the last five years. If these conditions are not met, the applicant must complete both the BCI and FBI checks for their application. When the applicant submits to renew a license (and this applies to permanent license holders as well), the date the application is submitted determines whether the applicant has completed an FBI check within the preceding five years or whether the person needs to update that check.

Permanent License Holders

Any person who holds a permanent license is only required to have an updated FBI check every five years, as long as the person has previously completed a BCI check and has lived in Ohio for the last five years.

Hopefully this information provides a quick and easy to understand overview of background checks. If you want to explore this topic further, you can find detailed information about the process by clicking here.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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3/31/2017

Ohio's Troops to Teachers Program Grant Request Submitted

By: Julia Simmerer

logo.pngVeterans working toward becoming teachers in the state of Ohio have allies in their transitions to second careers. Not only has Ohio eliminated educator license fees for veterans and active duty service members and their spouses, but the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Veterans Services will soon work together to administer the Ohio Troops to Teachers program, providing significant support to military service members during each stage of becoming a teacher in Ohio.

Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program collaborates with the U.S. Department of Defense’s National Troops to Teachers program. The program’s mission and purpose is to assist eligible military personnel in their pursuit of teaching as a second career in public schools where their skills, knowledge and experience are most needed to relieve teacher shortages — especially in math, science, special education and other critical subject areas.

The Office of Educator Effectiveness, within the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Department of Education, recently applied for a grant to significantly increase the funding of Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program. With this grant, the departments of Education and Veterans Services seek to increase the depth and breadth of Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program services.

Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program has the capability of providing substantial assistance to current and former service members seeking employment in Ohio as teachers. These veterans often run into hurdles that can complicate the process of becoming a teacher.

Undecided on committing to becoming a teacher as your second career? Speak with one of our program staff members who will be visiting college and university veterans centers, military organizations, and transition and education seminars across the state. Overwhelmed at the thought of transitioning careers, navigating the process of applying for a license and obtaining a teaching position? Visit Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program website and reach out to program staff members who are dedicated to individually counseling members of Ohio’s Troops to Teachers. Worried about finding a job or how to make the greatest impact through your service as a teacher? Work with Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program to identify open teaching positions, especially in critical areas such as the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. After fees are waived for active and veteran service members and their spouses, is it still not economically feasible to obtain an educator license or move your family in order to secure a teaching position? Apply through Troops to Teachers for a stipend or bonus to help ease these financial burdens.

I am proud our office has submitted a request for these grant funds, as I see Ohio’s Troops to Teachers program as just one of the many ways we can give back to our active duty and veteran service members who have sacrificed so much to serve and protect us. I hope that with these additional funds, we can reach out to even more veterans who are interested in becoming teachers and that our Troops to Teachers program can ease some of their burdens in continuing to serve the students of our state.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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5/9/2017

Reach Out to a Teacher Who Made a Difference

By: Julia Simmerer

Apple-hand.jpgTeacher Appreciation Week is an important time to take a moment to reflect and reach out to a teacher who has made a difference in your life. As senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession, my daily work focuses on ensuring educators have the support and development they need to work with all students in our schools, so educators loom dearly in my heart on a daily basis. It is nice to take a personal moment to step back and reflect on my own experience with a teacher who made a difference in my life, my fourth grade teacher, Ms. Sharon Tobe. My experience as her student shaped both my academic and personal life, and I am grateful I had her as a teacher.

I remember Ms. Tobe as a teacher who saw positive aspects of every student in our class. She found potential in students that they may not have seen in themselves — establishing an environment of high expectations for all. I was a very quiet and shy student who often flew under the radar of my teachers, until I entered Ms. Tobe’s room. She connected to me, as well as each and every student in that classroom and built an undeniable repertoire. For me, it was the continued encouragement that I was capable of great things and was encouraged to always do my best that stood out the most. She took a student who did not necessarily like math and helped me find a love for and confidence in myself that I could do math. She encouraged continual improvement, that I could do even one more problem correct than I did before. My confidence grew and a love for math developed.

Turn the clock forward, I myself became a teacher. I did not fully realize the significance of teacher recognition until I experienced it firsthand. I had a student, Mike, when I was a sixth grade teacher, and little did I know the impact I had on him at that time. When he graduated medical school, I received a kind message from Mike and his family about what I had done for him as his sixth grade teacher — blowing me away. The importance of his message to me cannot be understated. Even though many years had passed, his message had a profound impact and filled my heart.

Often teachers work hard without knowing how they are influencing the future. This is why Teacher Appreciation Week is so important — the profession helps shape the future in many unknown ways. Take a moment to reach out to teachers who have made a difference in your life and let them know what they have done for you. This is the true reward for the hard work and effort teachers put into their classrooms year in and year out. It is never too late to let teachers know this.

I can’t thank Ms. Tobe enough for the difference she made for me in those early years of schooling and beyond. It is the perfect time to reach out to her and let her know. I encourage you to do the same.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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7/6/2017

The Educator Standards Board: Promoting Educator Quality

By: Julia Simmerer

Ed-Standards-Board-1.jpgI would like to take this opportunity to highlight a group of Ohio educators that produces critical work in support of the teachers in our state and the quality education they provide to our students. If you haven’t heard of the Educator Standards Board, you’re not alone. So, I want to share some insight into the board’s members and the good work they do.

(L-R) Educator Standards Board members Jeannie Cerniglia, Jeff Cooney, Jeff Brown, and the Director of the Department’s Center for the Teaching Profession, Julia Simmerer. Photograph property of ideastream®

The Educator Standards Board’s mission is “to collaboratively promote educator quality, professionalism, and public accountability on behalf of the students and citizens of Ohio.” The Educator Standards Board is a recommending body to the State Board of Education and primarily develops and maintains sets of educator standards designed to ensure our state’s high expectations of educator quality are met. Here is some of the work the Educator Standards Board has accomplished thus far:

Tasked with duties that impact nearly every level of an educator’s work, a heavy burden lies on the Educator Standards Board to address the needs of all of those involved in Ohio education. Therefore, the very structure of board membership is designed to reflect the many groups that comprise our multifaceted field of education.

The Educator Standards Board is comprised of 21 voting members. Ohio law specifies that the board’s membership include individuals currently employed as: school district teachers (with representation from several student age groups, as well as from a chartered nonpublic school district); school administrators; a member of the Parent Teacher Association; and individuals employed by institutions of higher education that offer teacher preparation programs, with representation from private and state universities, as well as community or technical colleges. The State Board of Education appoints members of the Educator Standards Board nominated by teachers’ unions, educational associations that represent teachers, administrators, parents, school board members and institutions of higher education.

As you can see, it is true stakeholders who build the foundations upon which we identify the rigor necessary to be a school educator or administrator in Ohio. I’ve had the opportunity and privilege to attend many Educator Standards Board meetings and see the impressive work that the board produces. I believe that not only does the work of the board benefit its diverse membership but, additionally, everyone who has had the chance to work with and observe the board, myself included, has grown from the experience of hearing from so many different perspectives. If you ever happen to meet current or former members of the Educator Standards Board, thank them for their work toward ensuring a high-quality education for the students of our great state.

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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3/22/2018

Free and On Demand...What You Should Know About the Learning Management System for Ohio Education

By: Julia Simmerer

GettyImages-519912973.jpg“The most important attitude that can be found is the desire to go on learning.” – John Dewey.

Everyone is born with a natural desire to learn about the world around us and an eagerness to thrive in the world. The motivation to learn never ends — it continues throughout our lives and our careers. A recent Gallup poll revealed that 87 percent of millennials say job development is important in a job. Essentially, we crave opportunities to learn and grow throughout our lives.

Today’s technology also has made us crave media that is available at our fingertips. With streaming video services like Netflix, we can watch movies anytime and almost anywhere.  Internet-connected smart phones put the answer to almost any question right in our pockets. While an internet search can provide quick responses to basic questions, it isn’t the best method for developing our professional skills.  

The Ohio Department of Education recently introduced a new tool that both helps educators meet their learning goals and is readily accessible anywhere there is internet. The Department’s Learning Management System for Ohio Education, or LMS as it is commonly called, is a free, online learning system for actively credentialed educators. By logging in to their SAFE accounts, educators can participate in high-quality learning anytime — available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Department designed the current courses based on input from Ohio’s educators. The LMS allows districts to collaborate with each other through interactive discussion boards and activities. Each course covers specific skills that match an educator's job assignment. Traditional professional development courses in school settings offer “one size fits all” learning opportunities. This system allows users to select courses that are specifically relevant to their teaching assignments. The courses within the LMS also offer strategies that teachers can use immediately in the classroom.

Having spent several years as a classroom teacher, I recognize the benefits that free, online training brings to Ohio’s educators. Some of these benefits include not missing a day from class to participate, not needing a substitute teacher to cover your class and the flexibility to work from home at a time that is convenient for you. Now that I work for the Department, I appreciate that the system allows us to make sure everyone taking the course receives a consistent message and instruction — no matter where they are in Ohio.

To take a course in the system, educators sign in to their SAFE accounts and select Learning Management System. From there, educators can search the Course Catalog. Some of the topics covered by courses in the system include:

  • Instructional practices;
  • Evaluating digital content for instruction;
  • Transition services for students with disabilities;
  • Educator evaluation systems;
  • Instructional coaching;
  • Differentiation;
  • The Resident Educator program; and
  • The OhioMeansJobs resource.

Participants can complete reflections and time logs throughout the courses. This allows them to potentially earn credit for working on their Individual Professional Development Plans. (Educators should review each course’s syllabus for the recommended procedure for submitting their work to the Local Professional Development Committee.)

Currently, the Department’s Office of Educator Effectiveness is offering the following courses:

  • Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) for Teachers;
  • Learning About the Ohio School Counselor Evaluation System;
  • Ohio Principal Evaluation System (OPES): Essentials for Educators;
  • Resident Educator courses;
  • Formative Instructional Practices, (FIP) Series (seven courses available);
  • Coaching for Self-reflection and Instructional Change; and
  • Using the Ohio Standards for Professional Development.

If you have any questions about the LMS, feel free to contact Alison Sberna at Alison.Sberna@education.ohio.gov or (614) 369-4071. In the meantime, log in to your SAFE account now and take a tour of the Course Catalog. Instead of “binge watching” TV shows, let’s do some “binge learning” on the LMS.  

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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7/5/2018

ENCORE: Free and On Demand...What You Should Know About the Learning Management System for Ohio Education

By: Julia Simmerer

GettyImages-519912973.jpg
Editor's note: This blog was originally published on March 22, 2018, but some things are so good they deserve another look! We are re-running the post so everyone gets a chance to read this staff favorite and educators can take advantage of the LMS this summer.

"The most important attitude that can be found is the desire to go on learning.” – John Dewey.

Everyone is born with a natural desire to learn about the world around us and an eagerness to thrive in the world. The motivation to learn never ends — it continues throughout our lives and our careers. A recent Gallup poll revealed that 87 percent of millennials say job development is important in a job. Essentially, we crave opportunities to learn and grow throughout our lives.

Today’s technology also has made us crave media that is available at our fingertips. With streaming video services like Netflix, we can watch movies anytime and almost anywhere.  Internet-connected smart phones put the answer to almost any question right in our pockets. While an internet search can provide quick responses to basic questions, it isn’t the best method for developing our professional skills.  

The Ohio Department of Education recently introduced a new tool that both helps educators meet their learning goals and is readily accessible anywhere there is internet. The Department’s Learning Management System for Ohio Education, or LMS as it is commonly called, is a free, online learning system for actively credentialed educators. By logging in to their SAFE accounts, educators can participate in high-quality learning anytime — available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Department designed the current courses based on input from Ohio’s educators. The LMS allows districts to collaborate with each other through interactive discussion boards and activities. Each course covers specific skills that match an educator's job assignment. Traditional professional development courses in school settings offer “one size fits all” learning opportunities. This system allows users to select courses that are specifically relevant to their teaching assignments. The courses within the LMS also offer strategies that teachers can use immediately in the classroom.

Having spent several years as a classroom teacher, I recognize the benefits that free, online training brings to Ohio’s educators. Some of these benefits include not missing a day from class to participate, not needing a substitute teacher to cover your class and the flexibility to work from home at a time that is convenient for you. Now that I work for the Department, I appreciate that the system allows us to make sure everyone taking the course receives a consistent message and instruction — no matter where they are in Ohio.

To take a course in the system, educators sign in to their SAFE accounts and select Learning Management System. From there, educators can search the Course Catalog. Some of the topics covered by courses in the system include:

  • Instructional practices;
  • Evaluating digital content for instruction;
  • Transition services for students with disabilities;
  • Educator evaluation systems;
  • Instructional coaching;
  • Differentiation;
  • The Resident Educator program; and
  • The OhioMeansJobs resource.

Participants can complete reflections and time logs throughout the courses. This allows them to potentially earn credit for working on their Individual Professional Development Plans. (Educators should review each course’s syllabus for the recommended procedure for submitting their work to the Local Professional Development Committee.)

Currently, the Department’s Office of Educator Effectiveness is offering the following courses:

  • Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) for Teachers;
  • Learning About the Ohio School Counselor Evaluation System;
  • Ohio Principal Evaluation System (OPES): Essentials for Educators;
  • Resident Educator courses;
  • Formative Instructional Practices, (FIP) Series (seven courses available);
  • Coaching for Self-reflection and Instructional Change; and
  • Using the Ohio Standards for Professional Development.

If you have any questions about the LMS, feel free to contact Alison Sberna at Alison.Sberna@education.ohio.gov or (614) 369-4071. In the meantime, log in to your SAFE account now and take a tour of the Course Catalog. Instead of “binge watching” TV shows, let’s do some “binge learning” on the LMS.  

Julia Simmerer is senior executive director of the Center for the Teaching Profession at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees the implementation of policies and programs that support Ohio’s teacher and leader corps. You can learn more about Julia by clicking here.

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Last Modified: 6/1/2016 4:16:44 PM