Apprenticeships and Internships

Apprenticeships and internships are an integral part of Ohio career-tech Work-Based Learning. These two aspects of relating knowledge and skills to real-world work are defined below.

Internship

An internship is a temporary position with an emphasis on on-the-job training rather than merely employment, and it can be paid or unpaid. Companies usually have a specific project that is a good fit for interns.

An intern is someone who:

  • Is probably in school and usually wants to explore short-term options for their career pathway;
  • May be paid or unpaid; and
  • May work or study elsewhere after the internship

Youth-Pre Apprenticeship

The Youth-Pre Apprenticeship program is a collaborative partnership between a school and registered apprenticeship sponsor that provides students with exposure to the work environment.

Pre-Apprenticeship

The Pre-Apprenticeship program teaches basic technical and job-readiness skills for a designated apprentice occupation or sector to prepare students for a formal Registered Apprenticeship training program.

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job training and related technical instruction. A student must be at least 16 years of age except where a higher minimum age standard is required by law. An apprenticeship program must be registered with The Ohio Apprenticeship Council to teach a skilled occupation pursuant to a registered apprenticeship agreement.

Apprenticeship is limited to skilled occupations and trades that meet basic criteria through On-the-Job (OJT) Training and Related Technical Instruction (RTI).

Apprentice occupations are:

  • Customarily learned in a practical way through a structured, systematic program of on-the-job supervised training supplemented by related technical instruction;
  • Clearly identified and commonly recognized throughout an industry; and
  • Involve the acquisition of manual or technical skills and knowledge. There are currently over 950 occupations that have been recognized as apprentice occupations are continually being added to the list.

Apprenticeship is a highly desirable form of training for workers because it is learning job skills while earning an income, wage progression, and a widely recognized and portable certificate of completion and proficiency.

Apprenticeship programs are operated by both the public and private sectors. Employers, employer associations and labor-management committees sponsor and operate apprenticeship programs. Apprenticeship sponsors typically pay the training costs, although some financial incentives and assistance may be available.

Related instruction is commonly provided in the classroom, but other types of instruction, such as on-line learning and individualized instruction are also permitted. Federal rules recommend that apprentices complete at least 144 hours of related instruction per year, which many apprenticeship programs choose to require. In many apprenticeship programs, the related instruction can also lead to a college degree, thereby providing the individual with an opportunity to earn both academic and occupational credentials simultaneously. companies usually hire apprentices for skilled work (e.g.  welding, precision machines) and expect the apprentice to work for them as a full-time employee after the apprenticeship

An apprentice is someone who:

  • May or may not be in school;
  • knows what type of career pathway he/she wants to pursue;
  • Is almost always paid; and
  • Works (longer term than other work-based learning) side-by-side with expert employees on typical project work or in on-the-job training.

Apprenticeship Recruitment and Outreach Resources

Apprenticeship Links

School Apprenticeship Models*

Drug Policy – Page 19 (numbers 13 and 14) ).  It covers “…any drug use , possession, or sale while on placement or during the pre-placement screenings will also count towards the same punishment as if the offense had happened at Portage Lakes Career Center.”
 

* Used with permission
 


 

 

Last Modified: 12/1/2016 1:17:34 PM