Career Tech FAQs

CTE - Important questions & answers

Business & Administrative Services FAQ


CTE - Important questions & answers

    What is the difference between career-technical education (CTE) and workforce development (WFD)?

    CTE is the umbrella term for all courses, programs and initiatives that are part of career-tech, including OhioMeansJobs K12, Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS), Career-Based Intervention (CBI) and High Schools That Work (HSTW). WFD, which is the largest subset under CTE, are pathways and programs designed to prepare students for careers in pathways and programs within one of 15 different career fields

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    What is the difference between a CTE workforce development program and a CTE workforce development course?

    A WFD program consists of multiple courses, is at least 450 hours in length, and includes exploration and work experience to prepare students for further study and a career in their chosen career field. A WFD course addresses some of the content standards of a WFD program and in general contains content provided in a shorter time period (e.g. 60-280 hours).

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    What is the difference between career-technical education and other more traditional education?

    Increasingly, many CTE methods and strategies of learning in the context of the real world are being applied in traditional education courses. The key difference is with consistency around the word “both.” CTE programs are designed to help students meet both academic (mathematics, English Language Arts, science, etc.) and career field technical content standards with real-work experience. The technical content standards are revised, generally every five years, by panels of educators and business/industry representatives, and are embedded with the academic content standards.

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    If a school/district wants to start a secondary Ohio career-tech workforce development education program, when should planning start?

    Allow at least 18 months for planning and action prior to having the first students enrolled in the program.

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    What is the first recommended step to start a new program?

    Alignment with business/industry need now and for the future is the first and most important determining factor when starting a new WFD program. Nationally and in Ohio, WFD is provided within 16 career fields, including the areas of art/communication, agriculture, business, construction, finance, education, engineering, health, hospitality, cosmetology, information technology, public safety, manufacturing, transportation and marketing. Four parts of alignment with workforce development needs are outlined in a CTE/Tech Prep expectations document.

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    What are the other steps to starting an Ohio secondary WFD program?

    All new WFD programs must have a qualified teacher, the right equipment and facility, a linkage with one of Ohio’s CTPDs and all of the Program of Study components. More details about quality programming are on the Web. The forms to apply for program approval are called CTE-26 applications. Ohio workforce development program in a high school/career center must be at least 450 hours in a year.

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    Do districts need a Program of Study (POS) for every school in the CTPD?

    The FY2012 requirement is a minimum of one POS for each program, regardless of where it is housed. In FY2013, when all WFD programs will be Tech Prep, all must have a POS.

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    Is a POS needed for every college used for articulation with a program?

    No. The current requirement is for a minimum of one postsecondary POS for each secondary WFD program.

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    How many students are needed to have a secondary CTE program?

    The minimum number of students depends on the program and the school district. This is a local decision. For some programs, student-teacher ratio with equipment is a factor. Cost effectiveness is another factor.

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    What happens when the state eliminates a CTE course or program, and how does this impact the program status and teacher?

    The Office of CTE gives school districts a one- or two-year notice about the planned elimination of a CTE course (subject code) or CTE program, with guidance on how to transition the course or program. The transitioned CTE course(s) or program is based on different CTE technical content standards, so the local curriculum must be updated, and the teacher should obtain professional development and re-licensure as needed. The teacher may have professional work experience in the new career technical field and may be able to add a licensure area to their existing license.

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    How do community schools reporting CTE data?

    All community school data are reported in EMIS, the same as any other district would report data, and this data serves as the basis for each community school’s Local Report Card. The process depends on whether a community school student is enrolled in a WFD or CTE program through a CTPD or if the community school has its own approved and funded WFD/CTE program.

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    How can local districts provide input on quality programming?

    There are many opportunities to provide input, including the development of technical content standards and the creation of technical assessments. Those wishing to participate or suggest a business/industry or other partner for participation should contact the pathway consultants

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Business & Administrative Services FAQ

    When are schools required to begin teaching financial literacy?
    The financial literacy requirement of the Ohio Core (Am. Sub. S.B. 311) is effective with freshmen who enroll in high school on or after July 1, 2010 – the graduating class of 2014. Many schools have already begun including financial literacy in their programs of studies.

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    Is there a formally approved curriculum for financial literacy?
    No. There is no formally approved course of study. Financial literacy content is expressed within the Social Studies Academic Content Standards. Schools are expected to teach:
    • relationship of income level to supply and demand in the market;
    • roles of people in the economy;
    • consequences of choices affecting budgets, savings, credit, philanthropy and investments; and
    • the effect of interest rates on savers and borrowers.

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    At what grade level are schools required to teach financial literacy?
    There is no specified grade level for the teaching of financial literacy. Although the referenced content is found under the 11th-grade economics part of the Social Studies Academic Content Standards, schools have the option of teaching financial literacy at grades 9, 10, 11 or 12.

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    Who can teach financial literacy?

    Social Studies, Business Education, Marketing Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences teachers are all licensed to teach financial literacy. For specific licensure information, see the Certification and Licensure Dictionary.

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    Can teachers other than those licensed in business education, family and consumer sciences and/or social studies teach financial literacy?

    Yes, provided that the instruction includes the content found in the 11th-grade social studies academic content standard for economics and credit is not granted separately for the financial literacy instruction. For example, if personal finance is included as part of a discrete course, (such as Career-Based Intervention, mathematics, etc.), those teachers can provide that instruction since they are appropriately licensed to teach those courses. Credit, if granted, would be for the discrete course and not for personal finance. Remember that the Ohio Core does not require that students receive credit in financial literacy (that is a local district decision) but all students must receive instruction in financial literacy, however the district determines to provide it.

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    Can a school create a separate course to teach financial literacy?
    Yes. Schools have the option of creating separate stand-alone courses to teach financial literacy. There is no requirement as to the length of the course. It can be a credit-bearing course with local school board action.

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    Can a school require students to take a Social Studies course, a Business course or a Family and Consumer Sciences Course?

    Yes. School districts can require students to take a course that includes the fundamentals of financial literacy as a graduation requirement. Local boards of education reserve the right to increase graduation expectations beyond Ohio’s minimum requirements.

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    Is there a required graduation test for financial literacy?
    There is no statewide graduation test for financial literacy, although a local school district may choose to implement an assessment.

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    Are there alternative means for students to receive this instruction?
    Yes. There are a number of non-traditional ways for students to receive this instruction. Among them are educational options, post-secondary enrollment options and summer school programs. When these approaches are used to address the financial literacy requirement, all of the rules regarding these options continue to apply.

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    Is a school required to offer financial literacy as a stand-alone credit course?
    No. Schools are required to teach the content referenced by Am. Sub. S.B. 311 to all students. The content can be included in an existing course, for example American Government or Economics, as long as adequate time and attention is given to delivering that instruction. This is a local decision.

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    How should local districts affiliated with joint vocational school districts address the financial literacy requirements?

    This must be mutually determined between the local districts and the joint vocational school districts. Schools must be sensitive to providing financial literacy instruction for all students, even those who transfer in from other districts, before they are scheduled to graduate.

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    Do districts have to report financial literacy offerings?

    ODE has no current plans to survey districts on how they intend to meet this requirement. Different districts will approach it in different ways. The integration of financial literacy education can be taught by highly qualified teachers licensed in Social Studies, Business, Family and Consumer Science or other subject areas where financial literacy is taught.

    Click here for more information about Financial Literacy

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Last Modified: 8/19/2014 9:24:15 AM