Report Card FAQs

Ohio's Accountability System includes four components: State Indicators, Performance Index score, Value Added, and AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress). FAQs provided below offer in-depth explanations for the most common questions about the Accountability System and its implementation.

Local Report Card FAQ


Local Report Card FAQ

    Where can I provide feedback of the A-F report card?

    The Accountability Committee of the State Board of Education is tasked with implementing the A-F report card.  You can view their minutes and materials at the website.  You can provide feedback by e-mailing the committee at:  newreportcard@education.ohio.gov

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    What are the new measures that will be included on the 2013-14 Report Card?

    Several new measures will be included for the first time in 2013-14.  These include the graded K-3 Literacy measure, as well as the Prepared for Success measures of college- and career-readiness (which will be reported in 2013-14 and graded in 2014-15).  Other new elements include a district financial page and a Gifted education dashboard.

     

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    What is the 1% Cap Rule?

    Federal rules limit the percentage of students who may demonstrate proficiency through the use of an alternate assessment. This rule was adopted to constrain Local Education agencies (LEAs) from placing students in an "easier" testing environment as a way to boost test scores and meet AYP. The rule caps at 1% the percentage of students at the district level that may demonstrate proficiency through the use of an assessment based on alternate achievement standards. LEAs that exceed the cap will have some scores “demoted” from passing to failing for the purpose of the accountability calculations.

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    Does the federal 1% Cap Rule mean that I cannot use the alternate assessment for more than 1% of my students?

    No, the rule relates to counting students as proficient or higher for the purpose of the report card calculations.  It does not place a limit on the number of students who may be assessed using the alternate assessment.  It is up to each student’s IEP team to decide which assessment, standard or alternate, is more appropriate to use and the decision should be made based solely on what is in the best interest of the student.

     

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    My district used to be able to apply for an exception to the cap so that all of our proficient and higher alternate assessments would count in our accountability calculations. Does this waiver still exist?

    When the rule was first adopted, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) granted waivers to several states, including Ohio, so that districts could include more than 1% of their scores in the report card calculations.  The federal waiver no longer exists and most districts are now limited to counting just 1% of their tests.  The Ohio Department of Education does allow special schools with charters to serve high percentages of students with significant cognitive disabilities to apply for a waiver from the cap.  This waiver can be found here and it is limited to those few schools that hold special charters.

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    Can a small LEA apply for a waiver to find relief from this rule?

    ODE recognizes that small LEAs face unique challenges and there may be cases where a district or school is so small that it does not have enough students to count even one or two alternate assessments.  To address this issue, the agency has created a business rule to allow LEAs that have fewer than 1,000 students in its tested grades to include up to ten (10) alternate assessment scores in its report card calculations.  LEAs with more than 1,000 students will be limited to 1% of their total tested population.  Small LEAs do not need to apply for a waiver, the accountability calculations are configured to automatically include up to ten passing scores in cases where the total tested population is smaller than 1000 students.

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    When a district exceeds the cap, how are the scores chosen for demotion?

    ODE begins the process by calculating the number of demotions that must be made within each subject area.  The tests within each subject are then grouped by performance level (Proficient, Accelerated and Advanced), and demotions are made on a random basis starting with the group scoring Proficient.  If all the Proficient tests are demoted and the cap still is not reached, Accelerated tests will be randomly demoted.  Advanced tests will be demoted only if the cap still is not met after all tests in the other two passing ranges are demoted.  This process works to ensure that the highest scores are preserved for use in the Performance Index calculation.

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    Can my district choose which assessments are demoted?

    No, within each performance level, tests are chosen at random for demotion.  There is no mechanism for a district to “exchange” one test for another.

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    I have students who remain in high school for longer than four years because they are receiving services based on their IEP. How are these students counted in my graduation rate?

    Federal guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Education in December 2008 requires states to include all students, including those on an IEP, in the graduation rate calculation.  Students who remain in school for longer than four years are in the denominator of the calculation, but not the numerator, and are not considered on-time graduates for the purposes of the graduation rate.

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    Are students who remain in school for longer than four years, but who do eventually earn a diploma get counted as "dropouts"?

    No, the term “dropout” is used to identify a student who leaves high school without earning a high school diploma.  Students who take longer than four years to graduate are considered to be “not-on-time” graduates for the purposes of the cohort graduation rate calculation, but they are not counted as dropouts.

     

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    Which gifted students are included in the Gifted Value-Added measure?

    The Gifted Value-Added measure includes all students that have been identified as gifted in math and/or superior cognitive ability for the state math assessments, and reading and/or superior cognitive ability for the state reading assessments.

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    My school did not receive a Gifted Value-Added grade. How many gifted students are necessary to generate a grade?

    The Gifted Value-Added measure requires at least six (6) identified students in a single grade and subject to generate a Value-Added grade.  For example, a school with six gifted students in fourth grade math would receive a report, but another school with three gifted students in fourth grade math and three gifted students in fifth grade math would not.

     

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    How are accelerated students counted in the Value-Added measure?

     

    The Value-Added analysis for math and reading follows a cohort of students from one grade to the next, and is based on the change in achievement from one year to the next. A cohort of students is based on the students’ tested grade (rather than enrolled grade), and the cohort moves up one grade every year. However, when a student follows a non-traditional grade configuration, such as skipping a grade in a subject, the usual expectation of growth is no longer valid and applicable.

    The accelerated student is considered two different students in two different cohorts in the Value-Added model: one student from prior to the acceleration and one student from the acceleration on. The Value-Added report for a particular subject/grade/year only uses the test scores from students in a given cohort, even when students in the cohort have missing test scores, so the student must be considered (from a modeling perspective) two different students in two different cohorts. Note, this rule is subject-specific, so students who are accelerated in math but not reading are in two different cohorts: one where their reading scores and math scores prior to acceleration are connected and one where their math scores post-acceleration are connected.

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    My school has a student who is both on an IEP and identified as gifted in math. Can a student be in more than one subgroup for the Value-Added purposes?

    Yes, a student can be in multiple relevant subgroups for the Value-Added measures.  A student who is identified as gifted in math would be in the Gifted Value-Added measure and that same student would also be included in the Students with Disabilities Value-Added grade if he has an IEP.

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    When I viewed my school's Value-Added report in EVAAS, the numbers are different from what I see on my school's Report Card Progress page. Why are these numbers so different?

    The Value-Added grades are based on the Gain Index, which is obtained by taking the Mean Gain and dividing that number by the Standard Error.  The Gain Index is displayed in the table shown on the Report Card Progress page.  The EVAAS site displays the Mean Gain and the Standard Error.  ODE is working on updates to the EVAAS website to clarify these displays.

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    When I run an Advanced Report to view my school's Value-Added data, the column that reports the number of students used in the calculation is three times larger than my 2013-14 enrollment for each grade level. Why are these numbers so large?

    House Bill 555 requires up to three years of data to be used in the Value-Added calculation.  The numbers reported in the Advanced Report show students across multiple years when such data are relevant.

     

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    In my building's AMO measure, I had a subgroup that grew to have 30 students for the first time during the 2012-13 school year, but did not meet the AMO target for reading or math. Can this subgroup get partial credit and earn points towards the AMO letter grade?

    The AMO scoring calculation is outlined in Ohio’s approved ESEA Flexibility Waiver.  A subgroup that is being evaluated for the first time cannot earn points unless it meets the AMO target.  In subsequent years if the subgroup continues to be evaluated and shows improvement, it may receive points for closing its achievement gap.

     

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    I have a question that's not listed here. Where do I go?

    ODE's main line is available toll free at 1-877-644-6338.  You can also e-mail Accountability questions directly to accountability@ode.state.oh.us or more general questions can be directed to contact.center@ode.state.oh.us.

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Last Modified: 9/11/2014 3:49:46 PM