Comprehensive Literacy State Development (CLSD) Grant Frequently Asked Questions

Comprehensive Literacy State Development (CLSD) Grant Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions


General Questions

    1. What is the Comprehensive Literacy State Development Grant?

    Ohio was awarded a $42 million Comprehensive Literacy State Development Grant from the U.S. Department of Education to build on ongoing work to improve the language and literacy development of its children from birth through grade 12. Ohio will distribute approximately 95 percent of the award to local districts, community schools and early childhood education programs.

    The five-year grant will focus on developing model, comprehensive literacy sites in early childhood education programs and district preschools, as well as elementary, middle and high schools in each region across the state. Model sites will concentrate on implementing practices outlined in Ohio’s Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement.

    Ohio will distribute subgrant awards to districts and community schools as follows:

    • 15 percent to birth to kindergarten-entry early childhood education programs;
    • 40 percent to K-5 schools;
    • 40 percent to be split equally among middle and high schools.

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    2. What are the requirements for qualifying for local subgrants?
    Details will be available soon.

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    3. . What is the process for applying for a Comprehensive Literacy State Development subgrant?
    The competitive application and review process for the Comprehensive Literacy State Development subgrant currently is under development. The Department will release application details soon.
     

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    4. What is Ohio’s Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement?

    Ohio's Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement is a working document developed to meet state, regional and local needs for supporting language and literacy development in children ages birth through grade 12. Ohio’s plan was written by the State’s Literacy Team in 2017 and currently is being updated to reflect the team’s recommendations for revision.

    The document outlines the following five components to increase language and literacy proficiency:

    1. Shared leadership;
    2. Multi-tiered systems of supports;
    3. Teacher capacity;
    4. Family partnerships; and
    5. Community collaboration.
    The revised Ohio’s Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement will be available on the Department’s website in late 2019. Each section of the state plan is being updated to include most recent state literacy data, culturally responsive instructional practices, specific ties to the science of reading and explicit examples of evidence-based practices.

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    5. Will subgrantees be required to have Local Literacy Plans?
    Ohio’s competitive subgrant process will require applicants to submit Local Literacy Plans to provide evidence of the district’s commitment to high-quality, comprehensive literacy instruction supported by moderate or strong evidence, as defined under ESSA. Subgrant applicants must have local plans that include the identification of high-quality literacy instruction programs and aligned with Ohio’s Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement.

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    6. What is considered a high-quality literacy instruction program?
    As defined by the U.S. Department of Education, comprehensive literacy instruction means instruction that includes the following:
    • Developmentally appropriate, contextually explicit and systematic instruction, and frequent practice, in reading and writing across content areas;
    • Age-appropriate, explicit, systematic and intentional instruction in phonological awareness, phonic decoding, vocabulary, language structure, reading fluency and reading comprehension;
    • Age-appropriate, explicit instruction in writing, including opportunities for children to write with clear purposes, critical reasoning appropriate to the topic and purpose and specific instruction and feedback from instructional staff;
    • Makes available and uses diverse, high-quality print materials that reflect the reading and development levels and interests of children;
    • Differentiated instructional approaches, including individual and small-group instruction and discussion;
    • Opportunities for children to use language with peers and adults to develop language skills, including developing vocabulary;
    • Frequent practice of reading and writing strategies;
    • Age-appropriate, valid and reliable screening assessments, diagnostic assessments, formative assessment processes and summative assessments to identify a child’s learning needs, inform instruction and monitor the child’s progress and effects of instruction;
    • Strategies to enhance children’s motivation to read and write and children’s engagement in self-directed learning;
    • The principles of universal design for learning;
    • Depends on teachers’ collaboration in planning, instruction and assessing a child’s progress and continuous professional learning; and
    • Links literacy instruction to the state’s challenging academic standards, including standards relating to the ability to navigate, understand and write about complex subject matters in print and digital formats.

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    7. What are the criteria for a model site?
    The Department is partnering with national experts to develop a Guide for Model Comprehensive Literacy Sites. This guide will include required activities for model sites serving children birth to kindergarten entry, kindergarten to grade 5, middle school and high school. Please see the Department’s Grant Proposal for more information.
     

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    8. If a district or community school intends to apply for a subgrant but is not required by Ohio law to submit a Reading Achievement Plan by Dec. 31, 2019, does the district or community school need to submit a Reading Achievement Plan by Dec. 31, 2019?

    Districts and community schools interested in applying for the subgrant but not required by Ohio law to submit Reading Achievement Plans must submit Local Literacy Plans as part of the Intent to Apply. More detailed information on the steps of the application process, including the Intent to Apply, will be available soon.

    Districts and community schools required by Ohio law to submit Reading Achievement Plans to the Department by Dec. 31, 2019 may choose to utilize their submitted Reading Achievement Plans in writing their Local Literacy Plans.

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Last Modified: 12/2/2019 6:53:23 AM