Drive Policy and Practice with Data

Incident Reporting

Through the use of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, Ohio is systematically collecting data on Ohio students. In addition, many schools implement school climate surveys that yield additional information about elements of safe and supportive schools. In the resource section below, you will find information on where to find school climate surveys.

In order to monitor the climate in the learning environment, it is important to keep track of behavioral disruptions that may interfere with students’ learning.

Types of Incidents to Report

  • Assault
  • Threat (verbal or physical)
  • Weapon
  • Arson
  • Larceny/Robbery
  • Classroom Disruption
  • Arrest
  • Harassment (sexual, verbal, physical)

Types of Information to Collect

  • Staff completing report: Room:
  • Date and time of incident:
  • Location of the incident:
  • Person(s) involved in the incident:
  • Staff Student
  • Description of the incident:
  • Immediate action in responding to the emergency:
  • Action taken (or required) to prevent such incidents in the future:
  • Witnesses to the incident:
  • Date/time of report Signature

Data Elements

Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Ohio is tracking two categories (unintentional injuries and violence and alcohol and other drug use). Some of the following indicators fall within those categories.

  1. Percent of students who reported that they had been threated or injured with a weapon on school property one or more times (for example, a gun, knife, or club during the 12 months before the survey.
  2. Percentage of students in grades 9-12 who reported having been in a physical fight on school property at least one time during the previous 12 months.
  3. Percentage of high school students who reported that they were offered, sold, or given an illegal drug by someone on school property.
  4. Percentage of high school students who reported that they seriously considered attempting suicide.
  5. Did not go to school because they felt unsafe at school or on their way to or from school on at least 1 day.
  6. Ever been electronically bullied.

To find Ohio YRBS data, visit: Ohio Department of Health, http://www.odh.ohio.gov/odhprograms/chss/ad_hlth/youthrsk/youthrsk1.aspx

School Climate Standards

In 2005, The State School Board of Ohio adopted a set of standards for school climate. Working collaboratively with state and national experts, the Ohio Department of Education staff developed the following framework for school climate standards. They complement national standards for Content, Leadership, and Professional Development and the Parent Teacher Association’s National Standards for Family School Partnerships Standards. The framework is comprised of five standards and a set of indicators and sub-indicators that support the school community:

  1. Developing a shared vision and plan for promoting, enhancing and sustaining a positive school climate.
  2. Developing policies that promote social, emotional ethical, civic and intellectual learning as well as systems that address barriers to learning.
  3. Promoting practices that promote the learning and positive social, emotional, ethical and civic development of students and student engagement as well as addressing barriers to learning.
  4. Creating an environment where all members are welcomed, supported, and feel safe in school: socially, emotionally, intellectually and physically.
  5. Developing meaningful and engaging practices, activities and norms that promote social and civic responsibilities and a commitment to social justice.

To find the National School Climate Standards, see: http://www.schoolclimate.org/climate/standards.php

School Safety

The National Center for Education Statistics monitors indicators of school crime and safety nationwide. According to their 2011 Executive Summary, preliminary data show that there were 33 school-associated violent deaths from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2011. In 2010, among students ages 12–18, there were about 828,000 nonfatal victimizations at school, which include 470,000 victims of theft and 359,000 victims of violence (simple assault and serious violence. In 2009–10, about 74 percent of public schools recorded one or more violent incidents of crime, 16 percent recorded one or more serious violent incidents, and 44 percent recorded one or more thefts.

Their indicators are:

  1. Violent deaths at school and away from school
  2. Non-fatal student and teacher victimization
  3. School environment
  4. Fights, weapons, and illegal substances
  5. Fear and avoidance
  6. Discipline, safety, and security measures

The National Center for Education Statistics Annual Reports on School Crime and Safety can be found at: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/crimeindicators/crimeindicators2011/key.asp

The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to adopt a policy regarding school safety, after receiving input from local education agencies, pursuant to section 9532 of the No Child Left Behind Act. The following ODE policy was adopted by the State Board of Education on May 13, 2003:

A student attending a persistently dangerous public elementary or secondary school in Ohio, or who becomes the victim of a violent criminal offense, as determined by Ohio law, while in or on the grounds of a public elementary or secondary school that the student attends in Ohio during the time school is in session, or during school sponsored activities, shall be allowed to attend a public elementary or secondary school within the same school district that is not persistently dangerous, provided there is such a school in the district that offers instruction at the student's grade level.

To view the entire policy that includes definitions of key terms in the policy, see: Ohio School Safety Policy.

Through the use of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, Ohio is systematically collecting data on Ohio students. In addition, many schools implement school climate surveys that yield additional information about elements of safe and supportive schools.

There are two categories to track (unintentional injuries and violence and alcohol and other drug use). Some of the following indicators fall within those categories.

  1. Percent of students who reported that they had been threated or injured with a weapon on school property one or more times (for example, a gun, knife, or club during the 12 months before the survey.
  2. Percentage of students in grades 9-12 who reported having been in a physical fight on school property at least one time during the previous 12 months.
  3. Percentage of high school students who reported that they were offered, sold, or given an illegal drug by someone on school property.
  4. Percentage of high school students who reported that they seriously considered attempting suicide.
  5. Did not go to school because they felt unsafe at school or on their way to or from school on at least 1 day.
  6. Ever been electronically bullied.

To find Ohio YRBS data, visit: Ohio Department of Health

http://www.odh.ohio.gov/odhprograms/chss/ad_hlth/youthrsk/youthrsk1.aspx

Compliance with Policy

Currently, there are three policy requirements for schools related to safe and supportive learning. Following is information about the law. Related resource links follow.

Professional Development

HB – 422 Anti-Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying Model Policy

http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Other-Resources/School-Safety/School-Safety-Resources/Anti-Harassment-Intimidation-and-Bullying-Model-Po

In 2007, Ohio House Bill 276 mandated that the Ohio Department of Education, in consultation with other state agencies and education organizations, prepare a model policy to guide every district in developing a policy that prohibits harassment, intimidation and bullying. Each public school district (including city, local, exempted village, joint vocational districts and community schools), could choose to adopt the model policy or create its own policy aligned with the model. The bill also required ODE to develop a Safety and Violence Prevention Curriculum for district personnel. In November 2010, per HB 19, the policy was amended to include Section 3 on Violence Within a Dating Relationship. Ohio Substitute House Bill 19 (HB 19) became effective March 29, 2010. The bill requires public schools to incorporate dating violence into their policies prohibiting harassment, intimidation or bullying. School districts also must include dating violence prevention education in the health curriculum for grades 7 through 12.

This State Board of Education-approved model policy contains procedures for reporting, documenting and investigating incidents of harassment, intimidation and bullying (including cyber bullying) as explained in the model policy and Ohio Revised Code. The document delineates responsibilities for school personnel and presents student intervention strategies. The policy also states the requirements for districts to:

  • Consult with students, parents, school employees, volunteers and community members in developing policies and programs;
  • Publish policies in student handbooks and employee training materials;
  • Locally report on a semiannual basis a summary of reported incidents;
  • Provide training on local policies to the extent that state or federal funds are appropriated for these purposes.
  • Ohio Revised Code (ORC), Sections 3313.666 and 3313.667

School Safety Policy

http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Other-Resources/School-Safety/Safe-and-Supportive-Learning/School-Safety-Policy

Dating Violence

Dating Violence Prevention Education – House Bill 19

Ohio Substitute House Bill 19 (HB 19) became effective March 29, 2010. The bill requires public schools to incorporate dating violence into their policies prohibiting harassment, intimidation or bullying. School districts also must include dating violence prevention education in the health curriculum for grades 7 through 12.

All requirements of the bill were to have been met by late September 2010. ODE provides several forms of assistance to districts in meeting the requirements. Links to the following guidelines and resources can help districts that have not yet met the requirements. ODE’s Office for School Health and Wellness will update this web page periodically as more information and resources become available.

Professional Development

Supportive Learning Policies Adopted by the State Board of Education

Ohio School Climate Guidelines: These guidelines describe how schools can create environments where every student feels welcomed, respected and motivated to learn. While these guidelines target building and district administrators, they also can be useful as springboards for policy discussions with staff, students, parents, school boards and other community members.

Learning Supports Guidelines: Using the Comprehensive System of Learning Supports Guidelines, local district and school building leadership teams can create plans and policies to ensure that every Ohio student enjoys access to academic and nonacademic programs and support services that are critical for success.

The Model Anti-Harassment, Anti-Intimidation and Anti-Bullying Policy: This policy is designed to assist districts in meeting their requirement to have such a policy in place. The Ohio Department of Education, which drafted the policy in consultation with other state agencies, provides companion resources for school districts to help implement local policies.

Guidance for Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Policy: This policy is dedicated to eliminating: drug and alcohol around school grounds, on school buses or at school-sponsored functions; verbal and physical violence including bullying and gang participation; and student involvement in self-destructive acts including self-mutilation and suicide.

Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Policy: This policy directs the Ohio Department of Education to help school districts create safe, caring learning environments where students have access to practices and programs that prevent them from engaging in alcohol and other drug use, violence and other self-destructive behaviors, including suicide.

Related Resources

Ebased Academy is a free, online career development resource for health and human service professionals and educators seeking continuing education credits in substance abuse prevention and treatment, social work and counseling, health education, and school safety and security.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Modified: 12/31/2013 1:49:08 PM