Impact of Education Settings on Teacher Evaluations

Impact of Education Settings on Teacher Evaluations

Many schools began the year using online or blended models of instruction for the first time. These new experiences caused schools and districts to rethink educator evaluations given the new education settings. This webpage is intended to help districts locally discuss and plan possible evaluation approaches during the 2020-2021 school year. Educators and administrators have demonstrated great flexibility and adaptability when approaching teaching and interacting with students. As this year progresses, districts should continue this flexibility where possible to ensure educator professional growth takes place and leads to improved instructional performance and student learning.

This information does not list every possible scenario. It is intended to facilitate collaborative conversations at the district level to support effective implementation of the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) in the midst of ongoing concerns and changes during the COVID-19 pandemic.
 

Considerations to Guide Districts in Collaborative Conversations around Teacher Evaluations

While Ohio law and the OTES Framework (OTES 1.0 or OTES 2.0) detail the components of evaluation, the district determines the manner in which it will be implemented locally. As such, the evaluation process may look different from district to district dependent upon the education setting in use. Outlined below are questions districts should consider as the approach to teacher evaluations is determined for the 2020-2021 school year. As districts work through new and emerging situations, these questions are intended to encourage conversations to help in the decision-making process while considering the instructional approaches employed (see definitions below). 
 
  • What is the expectation of teachers and evaluators in different education settings? What changes if teachers move in and out of the education settings throughout the year? (District restart plans may include some of this information.)
    • School-based or site-based
    • Blended
    • Remote
    • Self-directed (proctored)
  • What does an observation look like in a remote setting?
    • Will evaluators attend the virtual classroom during the instruction?
    • Can the teacher submit a recording of the lesson/class period?
  • What does a walkthrough look like in a remote setting?
    • Will evaluators join the virtual classroom?
    • What if learning is asynchronous? How does the walkthrough occur?
  • Can a teacher teach remotely from home to students in a classroom?
    • What does the observation look like?
    • Can the teacher record a lesson?
    • Will evaluators sit in the classroom with students during the lesson?
  • What happens when a teacher conducts both remote and site-based instruction?
    • Will evaluators evaluate site-based teaching only or do an observation in each setting?
    • Will evaluators conduct walkthroughs in both settings?
    • Can the teacher submit a recording of the lesson?
  • What does a walkthrough look like in a blended setting?
    • Will evaluators conduct walkthroughs both in person and in remote settings?
    • Will evaluators conduct walkthroughs of the setting that is 50 percent or more of the teacher’s time?
  • Can a teacher in a site-based setting submit a recording of a lesson if a teacher in a remote setting is permitted to do so?
  • Does the evidence for various parts of the rubric look different in the various settings?
  • What expectations do evaluators have for specific pieces of the rubric?
 

Definitions

Due to COVID-19, districts are employing various education settings to provide instruction safely. The following definitions are intended to provide information and support a common understanding of what defines each setting. Additional information can be found on the Ohio Department of Education’s Reset and Restart Planning for Blended or Remote Learning webpage.
 
  • Synchronous:
    • Instruction and learning that happen at the same time for the teacher and learner. Synchronous instruction involves real-time interaction that may occur in person, remotely or a combination of the two.
  • Asynchronous:
    • Instruction and learning that does not happen at the same time for the teacher and learner. In asynchronous instruction, the teacher and learner are not engaged in the learning process at the same time.
  • School-Based or Site-Based Learning:
    • School-based or site-based learning takes place in a school building and is supervised by appropriate educational staff employed by the school or district.
      • Teacher and students are in a traditional classroom setting, with both teacher and students in the classroom.
      • Teacher is teaching most students in person while video broadcasting to remote students in synchronous learning.
    • Teacher would complete Roster Verification when applicable.
  • Remote Learning:
    • Remote learning occurs when the learner and educator, or source of information, are separated by time and/or distance and therefore cannot meet in a traditional classroom setting. The teacher could be doing one or more of the following:
      • Teacher-student interaction through online learning platforms in synchronous learning.
      • Online lessons for students to work on at home that have been developed by the teacher of record with knowledge of student learning, engagement and progress.
      • Offline lessons and instructional packets for students that have been developed by the teacher of record with knowledge of student learning, engagement and progress.
      • Asynchronous learning also may fall under this category if the teacher is developing, instructing and adapting lessons for students.
      • Teacher is using a third-party application for content, but the teacher is actively involved in differentiation of curriculum, instruction and assessments to meet students’ needs.
    • Teacher would complete Roster Verification when applicable.
  • Blended Learning:
    • Blended learning is a very specific learning arrangement that consists of a combination of site-based learning and online learning.
      • Students are in remote and site-based settings on a rotating basis.
      • Lessons are developed by the teacher of record with knowledge of student learning, engagement and progress in both situations.
      • The teacher is responsible for site-based instruction and assessment. Learning may include a third-party application.
    • Teacher would complete Roster Verification when applicable.
  • Self-Directed (Proctored) Learning:
    • Self-directed learning occurs when a student is largely responsible for the accomplishment of learning on his or her own.
      • Teacher is only proctoring a third-party application the student is using as curriculum.
    • Teacher would NOT complete Roster Verification.
 

Criteria for Teachers Who Should be Evaluated Using the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System

Given the new education environments, educators may be uncertain regarding who should be evaluated. Below are brief reminders of who must be evaluated under OTES.

Who should be evaluated?
Ohio law and the OTES Framework (OTES 1.0 or OTES 2.0) detail the required components of evaluation. However, all teachers may not be required to be evaluated using OTES. A teacher’s role within the locally determined education setting will guide this determination.
A teacher employed under a teaching license and spending 50 percent or more of the time employed providing student instruction via a site-based, remote or blended learning approach is required to be evaluated.
  • Example A: A teacher is hired to teach either site-based or remote instruction for one period of chemistry a day. The teacher is teaching 100 percent of the time employed with the district. This teacher should be evaluated using OTES.
  • Example B: A teacher is hired primarily to manage a grant awarded to the district. This teacher also teaches either site-based or remotely for one period of chemistry a day. The teaching is only 20 percent of the time employed with the district. This teacher is not required to be evaluated using OTES, but the district may elect to do so.
  • Example C: A teacher is hired to teach in a blended setting. The teacher instructs students both site-based and remotely. The teacher is instructing students more than 50 percent of the time employed with the district. The teacher should be evaluated using OTES.
 
Who may not be evaluated?
A teacher employed under a teaching license and spending 50 percent or more time facilitating/proctoring and not providing direct instruction to students is NOT required to be evaluated using OTES. However, districts may elect to evaluate these teachers.
A district also may elect not to evaluate a teacher who:
  • Has been board approved for retirement by Dec.1 of the current calendar year.
  • Has been on leave at least 50 percent of the school year.
  • Instructs less than 50 percent of his or her time employed.
  • Is participating in Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) for the first time and district selects the one-time RESA exemption.
  • Substitute teachers continue to be exempt from OTES.
 
Regardless of the education setting, to ensure required evaluation components and procedures are implemented, evaluators should:
  • Follow the evaluation cycle based on the appropriate COVID-19 OTES Cycles Chart and do one of the following as applicable:
    • For OTES 1.0, use only the Teacher Performance Evaluation Rubric.
    • For OTES 2.0, do not include the “Evidence of Student Learning” component on the Teacher Performance Evaluation Rubric.
 

Evaluation Components

The information below indicates the components and procedures that must be followed in the evaluation process for those teachers who will be evaluated using OTES. These components remain constant regardless of the education setting used.
  • OTES 1.0
    • Required
    • Not Allowable for 2020-2021
      • Teacher Category A1, A2, B or C for 2020-2021 school year
      • Student Growth Measures to measure student learning attributable to a teacher
  • OTES 2.0
    • Required
    • Not Allowable for 2020-2021
      • OTES 2.0 Rubric Component “Evidence of Student Learning”
 
 
 

Last Modified: 10/27/2020 12:14:44 PM