Post Secondary Enrollment Options - FAQs

Post Secondary Enrollment Options - FAQs

Post Secondary Enrollment Options FAQs Printable Version

High School

Vocational

Colleges

Nonpublic Schools

Home Education


High School

    What is the purpose of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    The purpose of the program is to provide enriched education opportunities to secondary grade students that are beyond the opportunities offered by the high school in which they are enrolled. This comes from Ohio Revised Code section 3365.02 with new language per House Bill 66. 

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    Who may take advantage of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program

    Any authorized student enrolled in Ohio public schools, in Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 may choose to participate under Option “A” or Option “B.”

    Examples of unauthorized students include foreign students who are not part of an exchange program, out-of-state students, students coded as unauthorized through EMIS, etc.) Any Ohio resident, nonpublic student in Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 may choose to participate if the nonpublic school is a participant in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program.

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    If a high school senior needs one required course to graduate and opts not to take it until a later time, can he/she continue to take college courses for another year?

    No. Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program are limited to a maximum of four academic years for those beginning as freshman and one academic year for those beginning as seniors. 

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    Can a student defer graduation and still be eligible for the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program for another year or until they are 21?

    A student is only entitled to participate in the program for the number of years dictated by their grade when they begin participation. A ninth grade student would be entitled to four years, a 10th grader 3 years, an 11th grade 2 years, and a twelfth grade student one year. If a student is required to attend high school for more than 4 years to obtain a degree as a result of an illness or some other extenuating circumstance, they still are only eligible to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program for the maximum number of years available when they began participation, not to exceed 4 years if they began when they were in 9th grade. If they began the program in 12th grade and 4 participated, but required an extra year to graduate, they would not have any eligibility left. 

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    Can a local board of education prevent a student from taking a particular course if it is stated in local board policy?

    No. Students who meet the eligibility requirements of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program may not be prevented by school officials from enrolling in college courses for high school graduation credit. Counseling services provided must, however, include a discussion with students and their parents/guardians the risks and impact associated with participation.

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    Can a public school require a student to take a minimum number of classes at the school before it approves participation by one of its students to enroll in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program? This scenario may also impact home-school students who attempt to enroll in a public school for the sole purpose of participating in the program.

    First, it must be determined if the student has a right to enroll in the public school. If the student does have the right to enroll, then it must be determined if the school has a policy in place that requires a certain number of classes to be taken in order to enroll in the school. If a policy exists, it must also be determined if the policy is being administered consistently to all students. If the school has students who are taking only one class, or are taking less than a full load of classes as defined by the school, the school cannot selectively enforce requiring a minimum number of classes be taken even if a policy specifying this requirement is in place. The example that was raised has to do with students enrolled on a part-time basis in a school for a particular class, such as driver’s education. If a school has a policy in place that requires full-time enrollment, or defines some minimum number of classes must be taken, and every student in the school is enrolled according to the policy, then it would be possible for the school to require that some classes be taken at the school, if an equivalent full-time load is not being taken at the college through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. 

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    Can a student take night classes? Can a student take weekend classes?

    Yes, students may take both. Students who meet the criteria necessary to participate are not limited to the hours of the official school day for scheduling college courses. 

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    Do study halls count as courses?

    No. 

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    What responsibility will school counselors have in providing counseling services regarding the program throughout the summer?

    None. Students who indicate interest in participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, together with their parents/guardians, must be provided with the counseling specified (see synopsis of 3301-44-03). Participating students should, of course, be provided with all school services normally provided throughout the year by school districts. 

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    What are the legal ramifications for a district if a student takes a class at the college three days a week and comes back to school property on the off days, or to participate in extracurricular activities?

    Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program remain high school students. They are entitled to participate in appropriate school district activities as long as they meet the criteria established by district policy or administrative procedures for participation. Students who earn all graduation credit through enrollment in college courses have no legal requirement to be in attendance at the high school, but certainly are entitled to the resources available to all students. 

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    If a high school student takes courses during a college second semester, and this course does not conclude before high school graduation, will the student be able to graduate?

    Many issues related to the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program need to be addressed by local policy and administrative procedures. If a district has a policy requiring that all graduation requirements must be completed in order to participate in graduation ceremonies, and is intent upon maintaining that policy, the participating student may have to forego participating in the ceremonies and receive his/her diploma upon completion of all graduation requirements. It is extremely important that students and their parents/guardians are aware of such policies and their implications prior to participation in the program.

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    If a student is taking classes at the college and the semester ends in May, but the high school semester does not end until June, who is responsible for her/his time? Is the student required to return to high school until June?

    In general, it is not necessary to require the student to return to the high school other than for courses and/or other appropriate activities. This depends in large measure, however, upon individual circumstances and school district policy and administrative procedures. Courses taken through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program need to be implemented, as most educational options, to allow for modification of instructional time requirements. Students and parents/guardians need to understand the social and academic risks associated with participation in the program.

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    Can there be an agreement between the colleges and high school to not accept a student after a certain date?

    Students who wish to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program must express their intent to school officials by March 30. Failure to do so will make them ineligible to participate in the program without the written authorization of the district superintendent or chief administrator. 

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    What happens when a student transfers into the district after the March 30 deadline?

    The district superintendent or chief administrator or his or her designee has the authority to allow students, on an individual basis, to participate in the program after March 30. Foreign exchange students may participate under the same provisions. They must receive written permission from the district superintendent or chief administrator in order to participate. 

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    After being informed of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, who shall sign off – everyone receiving the information, or only those who wish to participate?

    All students, Grades 8 – 11, and their parents/guardians must be annually notified of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program by March. Only those students who indicate, by March 30, that they are interested in participating are required to receive the counseling services. Interested students must sign a locally developed form indicating that counseling services were provided and the potential risks of participation are understood and accepted. 

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    Is it possible for a student to take a college course in the summer and receive high school credit for the course?

    Yes. Ohio law (ORC 3313.613) deals with high school credit for post-secondary institution classes outside school hours. House Bill 282 established that high school credit shall be awarded for a course successfully completed outside of regular school hours by a student at an accredited post-secondary institution. Such courses may either be free of charge or paid for by the parent, guardian or custodian of the student. High school credit awarded for a course successfully completed under this section shall count toward the graduation requirements and subject area requirements of the school district. If the school district offers a comparable course, comparable credit shall be awarded. If no comparable course is offered, the district board shall grant the appropriate number of credits in a similar subject area.

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    May a community school student enroll in a college-level class during the summer and have the cost of the course covered through the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program?

    The cost of the course may be covered provided that several conditions are met. The answer to this question depends on the community school’s definition of the school year since summer break may vary from school-to-school and differ between high school and college. A student could attend college classes on a full-time basis during that period of time if the community school in which the student is enrolled is in regular session. Special programs or remedial summer classes do not apply – the school must be in session for all students. The funds would be provided from the fiscal year in which the participant enrolled. According to law, a school year can start and end any time between July 1 and June 30. The school year of a community school does not have to coincide with the school year of the traditional public school that provides funding to the community school. If the school year of a particular community school begins sometime during the months of July or August, it would be appropriate for a community school student to attend a college class as part of the program, as long as the student had declared her/his intent to participate in the program by the previous March 30. If the March 30 deadline was not met, the governing authority of the community school could approve an exception to the policy and allow participation. All of the normal requirements and expectations associated with the program would have to be met. The cost of the class would be calculated in the normal way and the community school would be responsible for the payment to the college. The cost to the traditional public school would be the same as it would be if the student had attended the community school in the summer. There should not be a payment for more than 1 FTE for the student for the school year. 

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    May a traditional public school student enroll in a community school during its summer term and participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program by taking a college class during the summer?

    The answer to this question is similar to the one above. A student would only have to do this if the traditional public school did not hold regular sessions in the summer. If the school was in session year round, for example, the student could participate in the program during the summer without having to enroll in a community school. This student would be required to have met the March 30 deadline, but could have a waiver approved by the governing authority of the community school and be eligible to participate. All the normal requirements and expectations associated with the program would have to be met. 

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    Can a student enrolled in a traditional public school or community school that is in session 12 months out of the year participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program during the summer?

    Yes. If a school is in session, then a student may participate in the program and have the class covered, as long as all of the other requirements are met. Enrollment in the school during this period of time must be considered part of the student’s normal enrollment for the year so that funding reimbursement is not duplicated.

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    Is it possible for a student who is enrolled in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, under Option “A,” to receive both high school and college credit?

    Yes. The student may elect, upon enrollment, to receive both high school credit and college credit for courses taken. Except as provided in Section 3365.041 of the Ohio Revised Code, if the student successfully completes the course, the college shall award the student full credit for the course, and the board of education, community school governing authority or nonpublic school shall award the student high school credit. This became effective in the 2006 school year.

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    How does Ohio Revised Code section 3313.61.3 impact the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    It is not a part of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, but it offers a hybrid alternative of Options “A” and “B.” This statute is more recent than those pertaining to the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program and offers an opportunity for the student to obtain high school and college credit for the classes that are taken. However, the state would not pay for the course(s) because the cost would be the responsibility of the student if it was funded in some other fashion, such as through a grant. It offers a way for a Grade 9 student to take college courses for high school credit outside of regular hours, but does not impact or change Option “A” or Option “B” in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. 

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    Can a local board of education grant the student high school credit if the student is not under the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    Yes. Many school districts currently participate in concurrent enrollment and early entrance programs with Ohio colleges and universities. None of these programs is voided by the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. 

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    If the high school offers a course in its master schedule and the student wishes to take that same course, e.g., chemistry or physics in college for high school credit, can the student be required to take the high school course?

    No. Students who meet the eligibility requirements of the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program may not be prevented by school officials from enrolling in college courses for high school graduation credit. Counseling services provided must, however, include discussing with students and their parents/guardians the risks associated with participation. 

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    If the Grade 12 English course that is offered at the high school is more advanced than a college freshman English course, must credit be awarded by the high school?

    Yes. Appropriate high school graduation credit must be awarded for successfully completed college courses under Option “B” to meet the district’s total units of credit required for graduation. If the course is comparable to one required for graduation, appropriate credit must be awarded toward meeting that subject requirement as well as the total unit requirement. If the course is not comparable, the district must determine whether it is similar enough to a subject area requirement to be accepted as such, or whether it will be counted only as meeting the total unit requirement. Disputes between students and their school districts may be appealed by the student to the State Board of Education. 

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    If a school has block scheduling, how many periods does the school use for calculating the number of Carnegie units a student can take?

    Schools on a block schedule should use the equivalent of an eight-period day. 

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    If a student takes a course at a technical college and the high school has nothing similar to the course in its curriculum, what would happen?

    There are three levels of consideration for the awarding of high school graduation credit earned through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. First, all college courses successfully completed under Option “B” must be awarded high school graduation credit to meet the district’s total units of credit required for graduation. Second, if the course is comparable to one required for graduation, appropriate credit must be awarded toward meeting that subject requirement as well as the total unit requirement. Third, if the course is not comparable, the district must determine whether it is similar enough to a subject area requirement to be accepted as such, or whether it will be counted only as meeting the total unit requirement. Disputes between students and their school districts may be appealed by the student to the State Board of Education.

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    What formula or procedures do we use to determine the amount of time students must attend the high school if they are attending college part-time?

    This should be determined, generally, according to school policy and administrative procedures. Students will certainly be expected to be in attendance for courses scheduled at the high school. Many districts and nonpublic schools require students to be enrolled for a minimum number of units each term/year. Such requirements do not have to be waived for students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. This would include previously home-schooled students who enroll in the public school for the sole purpose of participating in the program. 

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    Who pays the post-secondary costs of a public student attending a post-secondary institution?

    Under Option “A” the participant or parents/guardians are responsible for all costs. Students may elect, upon enrollment, whether to receive only college credit or high school credit and college credit for the course. If the student elects to receive both college and high school credit and successfully completes the course, the college and high school shall both award full credit. Under Option “B” the student receives both high school and college credit with the public school district being responsible for the costs. 

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    Under the Postsecondary Enrollment Option “B” program, if a student completes a class, but receives a failing grade, who pays for the class?

    The parent/guardian or student pays. The superintendent or chief administrator of the student’s public, community or nonpublic school shall seek reimbursement from the participant’s parents/guardians for the amount of state funds paid to the college on behalf of the participant for that college course. The board of education of the school district, or the governing authority of the community or nonpublic school, may withhold grades and credits received by the participant until reimbursement is provided. Upon the collection of any funds, the chief administrator of a nonpublic school shall send an amount equal to the funds collected to the Superintendent of Public Instruction. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall credit that amount to the general revenue fund.

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    Under the Postsecondary Enrollment Option “B” program, if a student fails to complete a class, who pays for the class?

     

    Again, the parent/guardian or the participating student would be responsible for payment. The same collection procedures as described in the previous answer would apply in this case. 

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    Who is responsible for intervention if the student fails a college course being taken for college credit?

    Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, together with their parents/guardians, must be aware of and understand the social and academic risks of participation. Any necessary intervention may be, but is not required to be, provided by the student’s resident school district, community school or nonpublic school. Participants and/or parents/guardians are responsible for reimbursing the district, community school or nonpublic institution for any courses in which the participant receives a failing grade. Grades and credits may be withheld for non-payment. 

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    If a student moves from one district to another during the school year, which district is responsible for payment to the college?

    When a student moves, the district in which the student resided at the time the course started is responsible for payment for that semester or quarter. The student must then obtain special permission from the new district administration in order to take additional courses the following semester or quarter. If the new district approves courses for the following semester or quarter, it will take over the payment responsibility. 

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    If a student attends a school district through open enrollment and then participates in the Postsecondary Enrollment Option “B” program, which district is responsible for payment?

    The educating district is responsible for all post-secondary costs. 

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    Who will pay the difference if the cost of the college course(s) is more than the allocated formula amount as specified in law?

    No one. Colleges and universities choosing to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program understand and accept the fact that reimbursement for students electing Option “B” will be fixed and, in some cases, may not cover all costs directly associated with courses taken.

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    If a student chooses to attend a college as a full-time student far away from home, who shall pay for room and board?

    The student/parent. Only those costs for tuition, textbooks, materials and fees directly related to the course may be funded through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. In some cases, depending on financial need, transportation costs may be reimbursed; but room and board, if necessary, are the responsibility of the student/parent. 

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    Could a student somehow arrange to get more college courses paid for than what was originally intended by participating in this program?

    No. Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program are limited to a maximum of four academic years. No student may earn more than the total number of Carnegie Units that might be earned using every period available during the school day (excluding the standard lunch period). Students participating at the beginning of the ninth grade may do so for four full years; those who participate at the beginning of Grade 12 may do so for one full year. Eligibility to participate may be carried over from one year to the next. 

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    Who owns the textbooks that are provided by the post-secondary institution for students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Option “B” program?

    The books belong to the post-secondary institution. If the institution does not want the books, then the public school can claim them. If the public school does not want the books, then the student can claim them.

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    How much college credit may be earned by a student who is taking high school courses during every available period during one semester, but has one study hall during the second semester?

    Anytime a student is enrolled in high school courses for credit during every available period, that student may not participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program during that term. This is true whether or not the student is earning the maximum number of Carnegie units possible. If, however, during the course of the year, the student is scheduled for credit courses in fewer than every available period, that student may participate in the program and earn college credit equal to the difference between what the student will earn in high school and the maximum credit that is possible to earn in high school during one academic year (summer excluded).

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    Can a student take college courses pass/fail for high school credit?

    Yes. Whether and the manner in which grades earned by the students enrolled in college courses for high school graduation credit impact on the student’s high school grade point average is left to the home school district to determine. The calculation of the GPA for students is left up to the local district’s policy. 

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    What if a local district requires a letter grade for all courses?

    The local district will need to develop a policy to credit college courses taken pass/fail with a letter grade.

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    Under the Postsecondary Enrollment Option “B” program, is distance learning and correspondence acceptable?

    Yes, as long as they are provided by an Ohio post-secondary institution. 

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    Do courses in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program count toward the honors diploma?

     

    Yes. Honors diploma rules specifically allow for post-secondary options to count toward honors diploma credit. (See: Criteria for Honors Diploma from the Center for Curriculum and Assessment). 

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    When a student is 18, by law the college must require the student to sign a release form to release his/her grades. If the student doesn’t wish the grades to be sent back to the high school, how will the high school receive a record of the student’s grades?

    Students over the age of 18 who wish to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program will have their grades sent to the appropriate school authorities as a condition of acceptance. 

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    How does the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program work with competency-based education and proficiency testing requirements and diplomas? How can we be sure students are learning what they need to know for these tests when taking college courses?

    No high school graduation requirements may be waived as a result of participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. Participating students are subject to the same home school district requirements as are all other students. While some of these requirements may be met through other options, they must nevertheless be met. Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, together with their parents/guardians, must be made aware of and understand the social and academic risks of participation.

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    What, specifically, will be the transportation obligation to the district?

    The responsibility to the district for transportation costs is specified in the synopsis of Rule 8. In general, transportation costs may only be made on the basis of financial need and are recouped by the district by listing the students on the district’s T-1 from as a “payment in lieu of” student.

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    What are the legal ramifications of requiring a student who has not studied the curriculum upon which the test is based to take the test?

    Sections 3301.0710 and 3301.0711 of the Ohio Revised Code established a statewide system of student achievement tests. These sections are clear that enrolled 15 students must take these tests at the grades indicated in these sections. In fact, Section 3317.03(E)(3) of the Ohio Revised Code forbids the state from counting students (for subsidy purposes) who did not take the required test(s) the preceding year, unless students were excused from taking the test(s). Students (other than certain students with disabilities) who are excused from taking the test(s) must take them within nine days of the test date as indicated in section 3301.0711)(C)(2) of the Ohio Revised Code. Clearly, the expectation is that students are to take the required state achievement test. Finally, local boards of education have broad powers, under section 3313.47 of the Ohio Revised Code, to exercise “management and control” of their schools. A series of court decisions has upheld school boards’ authority to implement and enforce reasonable policies related to management and control of the boards’ schools. If it is the policy of the local board to require enrolled students to take state achievement tests, given other statutory provisions cited, that is certainly within their authority. 

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    Is it permissible for a student, from outside the state, to enroll in an Ohio school and participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    No. Ohio Revised Code (section 3365.02) states that a secondary grade student must be a “resident of this state” in order to participate in the program. An exception would be an exchange student attending school through a recognized program. 

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    May a foreign exchange student participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    Yes. A student attending a school district through a recognized exchange program pursuant to Ohio Revised Code section 3313.64, shall be “allowed to participate in all student activities at the school where the student is attending on the same basis as any student who has always attended the schools of that district while of compulsory age.” If the student is here in this state through something other than a recognized exchange program, or is an unauthorized foreign student, they would not be allowed to participate in the program. 

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    May a foreign exchange student, going to a community school, participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program if the public school district has a policy limiting the number of foreign exchange students and they have their maximum number of foreign exchange students enrolled?

    Some boards of education have adopted policies limiting the number of foreign exchange students that they will accept each year. If the board policy states the district will accept two students and they have two students enrolled in their system, then their board policy has been met. A student attending a community school living in the same district would not be eligible for the program, or any funding. 

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Vocational

    Can a vocational student attend college full-time during the last two years of high school and still qualify for a vocational certificate?

    If credit earned in a college course is comparable to one required for graduation, appropriate credit must be awarded toward meeting that subject requirement as well as the total unit requirement. If the course is not comparable, the district must determine whether it is similar enough to a subject area requirement to be accepted as such, or whether it will be counted only as meeting the total unit requirement. If there are additional requirements for graduation and/or specific diplomas or certificates, which are not met through participation in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program, the responsibility for meeting such requirements continues. 

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    If a vocational student enrolls and then drops out after Oct. 1, how will the funding be handled?

    The appropriate costs for participating students enrolled in joint vocational schools will be shared by the home school district and the joint vocational school. The procedures to be applied are included in the synopsis of Rule 7.

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Colleges

    Are post-secondary institutions required by law to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    A state supported, private or proprietary institution is not required to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. 

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    May a student attend college on other premises outside the actual college campus?

    The program is intended to allow high school students to experience college work/life realistically. This suggests that the most appropriate experiences and resources are available on college/university campuses. However, there is no specific prohibition against such experiences being located in other settings or through other means, provided the program is available to all other eligible students enrolled at that college. 

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    Can a college admit only juniors and seniors into this program?

    No. If the post-secondary institution elects to participate in the program, it must be open to all eligible students in Grades 9 through 12. Colleges may establish their own admissions standards, but not totally exclude any group.

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    Will colleges send progress and attendance reports to the high school on a periodic basis?

    There is no requirement that participating colleges and universities send progress reports to school district officials. They may, of course, choose to do so if they desire. Neither are they required to send attendance reports unless students formally drop courses and/or discontinue attending classes. In such cases, colleges and universities are required to report such action to school officials in a timely manner, not to exceed 14 days. 

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    Will colleges/universities send final grades from courses taken to the high schools at the end of each term?

    Yes. Colleges and universities participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program are required to report student grades to all appropriate parties, including the home school district or nonpublic school. 

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    May a high school student participate in any college sports, music, drama, etc.?

    In general, no. Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program continue to be high school students. While some college activities may directly relate to specific courses taken by these students (e.g., art, music, drama activities), most such activities are inappropriate. Guidance from participating colleges needs to be sought on an individual basis.

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    Does the high school have to accept college courses in religion?

    Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program may enroll exclusively in nonsectarian courses. Courses such as the history of religion and comparative religions, are not generally sectarian in nature and should be awarded high school graduation credit upon successful completion. School district policy and administrative procedures together with sound professional practice and wisdom should be relied upon when making such decisions.

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    Will the universities place any controls on the purchase of books, lab fees and other materials?

    Participating colleges and universities are required to provide students electing Option “B” with the textbooks and materials directly associated with course(s). Reimbursement for tuition, books, materials and fees will be made according to established procedures (see the synopsis of Rule #8). 

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    Are scholarships considered financial aid?

    Students participating in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program under Option “B” may not receive additional financial support from the Student Loan Fund. There is no other specific prohibition against accepting scholarships or other financial aid. 

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    Can a university or college that participates in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program limit student only to those who choose Option “A” under Ohio Revised Code section 3365.04?

    No. The law is clear that both options must be available to high school students. The only discretion a participating university or college has is to determine whether the student is qualified academically to enroll. 

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Nonpublic Schools

    If a nonpublic school can establish a policy that certain classes have to be taken at the school, does a public school have the same right to establish a similar policy before it approves participation by a student in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    A public school does not have the right to establish such a policy, if all the requirements for graduation can be satisfied by taking classes at the college through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. The public school student has the right to take a full-time load at the college, without the public school being able to require attendance at any classes at the school. 

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    Does a school board of a nonpublic school have the right to approve a policy that requires a student to take a minimum number of specific classes at their school in order to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    A nonpublic school can establish any policy it wishes. It can even elect to not participate in the program. An example may include the right of a Catholic school to implement a policy requiring students enrolled in its school to complete religious classes at the school in order to graduate, even if the student is taking a full load of classes at a college through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program. This would be allowable even if a nonpublic school student was taking the equivalent of a full-time load at the college through the program. The nonpublic school could still require attendance in specific classes at the school, as part of its graduation requirements. A nonpublic may operate differently than a public school. 

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    What happens if a nonpublic student fails a course taken through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    The student or the parent/guardian is responsible to reimburse the state of Ohio for the cost of the failed course.  

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    May a nonpublic student attend more than one college through the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    A nonpublic student may apply to more than one college; however, the student will only be allowed to attend one college through the program.  

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Home Education

    Is a home-educated student eligible to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program?

    Yes. House Bill 59 of the 130th General Assembly amended Revised Code Section 3365 to allow home-schooled students to participate in the program.

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    How will a home-schooled student apply for program funding?

    The process for home-schooled students is very similar to that used for nonpublic students. Home-schooled students need to be accepted by an institution of higher education and then apply to the state for funding. The application deadline is June 15. Students will need a representative of the institution of higher education to sign the application to verify acceptance. The student must also attach the letter from the superintendent of their local school district which excuses them from the state’s compulsory attendance law or have the superintendent sign the application.

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Last Modified: 3/18/2014 10:03:17 AM