Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP)

Rural Header

Approximately 664,000 students reside and go to school in an Ohio rural school district. Rural schools benefit from being located in small communities that center many life activities around their schools. About 200 rural districts receive supplemental federal funding from the Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP).


Changes Due to Every Student Succeeds Act

Crosswalk Document
ESEA/No Child Left Behind Act (enacted January 8, 2002) and ESSA Act (enacted January 6, 2016)

Title V Part B (REAP) provides supplemental funding to support eligible rural districts that do not have the capacity to compete for federal competitive grants and receive smaller allocations in Federal entitlement funds. The REAP funds are used to implement effective Federal programs to improve student academic performance.

There are two initiatives under REAP:

  1. Rural Low-Income School (RLIS)
  2. Small Rural School Achievement Program (SRSA)
FY 2018 Eligibility for Rural Low-Income School (RLIS) and Small Rural School Achievement Program (SRSA)

Is my district rural?

There are two ways to identify if your district is rural.

  1. National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Locale Codes: Locale codes are a measure of the geographic area of a school district. The codes range from “large city” to “rural.” Based on the geographic standards used in the 2000 Census, there will be new codes for school year 2017-2018 and beyond. The current codes were used for school year 2016-2017 and before.
  2. Ohio’s Alternative Definition for Rural: Each state may select an alternative definition for rural to identify districts that may qualify for REAP funding. When NCES makes a change in a locale code, some districts which previously were eligible for REAP are no longer eligible and lose this valuable funding. Ohio has a new an alternative definition using a District’s Typology. Those districts identified as rural under District Typology may meet the criteria for REAP funding. REAP considers other factors such as the district’s historical funding, poverty level and location relative to urban areas in the state. 

Resources

Last Modified: 9/6/2017 9:39:24 AM