Frequently Asked Questions for the Language Usage Survey

General Questions


General Questions

    Who completes the Language Usage Survey?
    All new students enrolling in grades preK-12 complete the Language Usage Survey. When students transfer from other districts or schools, enrollment staff should refer to existing records to determine English learner status. In the absence of records, administer the Language Usage Survey.

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    Since the Language Usage Survey is required for the 2018-2019 school year, is it necessary to re-administer the new version to those parents and guardians who completed the previous home language survey for their children?
    No, schools and districts do not need to re-administer a language survey to students who already have completed a home language survey. Districts and schools should make every effort to move forward using the Language Usage Survey as part of the required standardized identification process.

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    Does all the information in the new Language Usage Survey need to be included word for word on our registration form?
    Yes. Toward a uniform process, schools’ registration forms must include all information from the Language Usage Survey (e.g., opening note to parents, explanation of each section of questions and the closing sentences at the bottom).

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    The Supreme Court case Plyler v. Doe (1981) ruled that schools cannot require parents to respond to questions related to immigration status. However, question 3 on page 2 of Appendix A (see below) requires a response specific to the child's "Immigrant Student Status." Please clarify what questions are asked to parents and guardians.
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    The sole purpose of question 3 on page 2 is to establish the number of students who count toward the Title III Immigrant grant allocation. The question is not used to determine citizenship status. Schools may not require, as part of school enrollment, responses to questions regarding citizenship status.
    Immigrant students, as defined by Title III, are determined by responses to questions 5-7 on page 1 of the Language Usage Survey. Under Title III, the term “immigrant children and youth” refers to individuals who:
    • Are ages 3 through 21;
    • Were not born in any state. “State” means the 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Section 3127 of ESEA). Children born to U.S. citizens abroad (e.g., children born on a military base overseas) may be considered immigrants if they meet all the criteria in the definition of immigrant;
    • Have not been attending one or more schools in any one or more states for more than three full academic years. A full academic year is 10 months of school attendance, kindergarten through 12th grade. If a student has been in different schools in different school districts and even in different states, the number of months the student has been in school in any one or more states must not add up to a total of more than three full academic years. (ESEA Title III, Sec. 3201(5))
    Under the U.S. Supreme Court case Plyler v. Doe, schools must provide equal access to public education to all students, regardless of immigration status. The term “immigrant,” as used in the Language Usage Survey, refers to the Title III definition of immigrant youth, not an individual's immigration status in the United States. When asking for such information, the school or district should note in writing that the family does not have to provide the information and information provided will only be used to determine whether the child may be eligible for district programs that enhance instructional opportunities for immigrant children and youth. Any online registration process may not require responses to questions related to immigrant or citizenship status to complete the online process. Only after determining a student meets the initial criteria for Title III eligibility should the school or district ask questions to determine the cumulative number of months the student has attended schools in the United States.

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    Except for families showing certain documentation (proof of residency, etc.), parents in our district complete enrollment online. Is it acceptable to include the Language Usage Survey as part of our online registration process?
    Districts and schools may administer the survey online. Digital or online formats of the survey must include all information from the paper form (Appendix A). Furthermore, any online registration process may not require that responses to questions related to immigrant status be completed. The survey should allow the parent to move to the next questions and to complete the Language Usage Survey.

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    May online surveys be signed digitally or should the paper copies also be signed?
    Families and validating employees may sign the survey digitally. Electronic signatures should be validated by the individual assigned to do the Language Usage Survey quality check. Districts must have written procedures that explain how the information provided in the Language Usage Survey is maintained and, in case of student transfer, shared along with other records.

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    Is the Language Usage Survey available in a Word document format? This could facilitate translation and use of a district’s or school’s logo.
    The Language Usage Survey and translations are available in Adobe pdf and Microsoft Word files on the Ohio Department of Education website.

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    Can we modify the form to communicate more clearly to new families enrolling in our school?
    Schools and districts may modify the Language Usage Survey without changing or omitting the content that is communicated to parents on page 1.

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Last Modified: 8/29/2018 3:46:48 PM