Dyslexia Resources

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Students with dyslexia, according to the International Dyslexia Association, show a cluster of symptoms that typically pose difficulties with specific language skills, particularly reading. Because these individuals have been found to have problems identifying the separate speech sounds within a word and/or learning how letters represent those sounds, they also usually experience difficulty with spelling, writing and pronouncing words. Dyslexia is not due to either lack of intelligence or desire to learn; with appropriate teaching methods, students with dyslexia can learn successfully.

Dyslexia Pilot Project

The Ohio Department of Education is conducting a three-year Dyslexia Pilot Project in several Ohio school districts, in accordance with Ohio House Bill 96. The project’s goal is to evaluate the effectiveness of early screening and interventions using multisensory structured language instruction for children at risk for reading failure, including students exhibiting risk factors for dyslexia. Following the pilot’s conclusion in 2015, the department will conduct a formal evaluation and report recommendations to the General Assembly. Read more about the Dyslexia Pilot Project here.

Resources

International Dyslexia Association (IDA)

The National Center for Learning Disabilities

Children’s Dyslexia Centers – The Masonic Scottish Rite sponsors free training for teachers and free tutoring for children with dyslexia. Ohio has 11 centers.

The Center for Instructional Supports and Accessible Materials – Provides access to and the availability of quality accessible instructional materials (AIM) for students with print disabilities.

Regional State Support Teams – Ohio’s state support system includes State Support Teams who use a connected set of tools to improve instructional practice and student performance on a continuing basis.

Educator Preparation

  • House Bill 157 provides training for teachers by educational service centers statewide in evidence-based reading instruction and multisensory structured language instruction. For more information, contact your local educational service center.
  • Another consequence of this legislation is that the Ohio Board of Regents formed a task force to recommend required college courses for teaching reading (for students at risk for dyslexia) within the teacher education track. As a result, the Ohio Board of Regents prepared the document Dyslexia Guidance and Requirements for Ohio Educator Preparation Programs.
     

Last Modified: 1/2/2014 10:34:53 AM