HQT FAQs

For Teachers

For Paraprofessionals


For Teachers

    Why was the HQT Toolkit updated in the Fall of 2017

    With the full implementation of ESSA, extended options are available to assist teachers in meeting HQT requirements. The update reflects these extended options.

     

     

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    Who must be reported as highly qualified teachers under the ORC state definition?

    Teachers who teach in a core academic subject area must be reported. All core academic subject teachers who are assigned students in EMIS must have their HQT status reported in Initial Staff/Course Collection. All other core academic subject teachers (including tutors) must have their HQT status on file at the school. 

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    What are the core academic subjects?

    According to ORC 3319.074 (A)(1) “Core subject area” means reading and English language arts, mathematics, science, foreign language, government, economics, fine arts, history and geography.

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    Does state law provide flexibility to achieve HQT beyond past NCLB federal regulations?

    No. According to 3319.074 (B) no district or school shall employ any classroom teacher hired after July 1, 2002 that receives Title I funds who is not highly qualified. 

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    What is the definition of “teaching assignment”?

    Teaching assignment is the grade level and core academic subject(s) a teacher is teaching this school year.

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    What is the expiration data of a teacher's HQT status?

    Although teachers must report their HQT status every year, they do not need to re-qualify every year. Once teachers can show they are HQT using Forms A-E, Form A-Extended Options, Form B-Extended Options, Form C-Extended Options, and/or Ohio Highly Qualified Teacher Expanded Rubric in this toolkit, they can continue to use that evidence to re-qualify every year in that same subject and grade level.

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    On the Ohio Highly Qualified Teacher forms, what does a “clock hour” mean?

    One “clock hour” is 60 minutes of professional development (one semester hour of coursework = 15 clock hours; one quarter hour of coursework = 10 clock hours).

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    Could someone teaching in grades 7-12 be partially highly qualified if he or she is teaching two different core academic subject areas?

    Yes. A teacher might meet the criteria for some of his or her teaching assignment classes, but not all; therefore, some of these classes would be counted as being taught by a highly qualified teacher and some would not.

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    Do the state highly qualified requirements apply to career-technical teachers?

    Yes, if those career-technical teachers are teaching a core academic subject area.

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    What master’s degrees can be counted on the HQT forms (Form A-Extended Options, Form D) for teachers who teach in grades K-6?

    Possible examples of master’s degrees that qualify for HQT in grades K-6 include the following areas: 1) Education; 2) Special Education; 3) Curriculum/Instruction; 4) Reading; or 5) Teaching. Master’s degrees in education administration, educational leadership or school counseling do not apply.

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    What master’s degrees can be counted on the HQT forms for teachers who teach in grades 7-12? I have a master’s in special education. Does that count?
    A grade 7-12 teacher must hold a master’s degree in the core academic subject of his or her teaching assignment. No, a master’s degree in special education does not count toward HQT in grades 7-12.

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    What is the timeline for the 90 clock hours of high-quality professional development? From what point can one begin to count the 90 clock hours?

    Professional development may be counted since September 1998 and post initial certificate/licensure. For example: if a teacher received an initial teaching certificate/license before September 1998, he/she may use any professional development since September 1998; if a teacher received an initial teaching certificate/license after September 1998, he/she may use any professional development since the issue date of that initial certificate or license.

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    Are teachers in alternative licensure pathways considered fully licensed or certified?

    Yes. They meet the requirements of Section 2 (see page 4). Those teachers still must comply with Section 3 to be highly qualified.

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    Are teachers with a supplemental, one-year out-of-state educator licenses, or three-year visiting international teacher licenses considered fully licensed or certified?

    Yes. They meet the requirements of Section 2 (see page 4). Those teachers still must comply with Section 3 to be highly qualified.

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    I have a professional educator license and am planning to renew this credential. I know I must request approval from my local professional development committee (LPDC) to take professional development as part of the requirements for renewal. How do I know if I have the appropriate amount and type of professional development toward the 90 clock hours required?

    To show appropriate content knowledge for your teaching assignment, you need a total of 90 clock hours of professional development. You need a minimum of 45 clock hours in the specific content area of your teaching assignment. You also may use a maximum of 45 clock hours in teaching skills or pedagogy. All clock hours may be in content knowledge.

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    I currently hold a general education grades 1-8 (or K-8) license. Which forms do I need to use?

    General education educators, who hold a grade 1-8 (or K-8) license, will need to complete Form A and/or Form B, depending upon their teaching assignment. Use Form A for a teaching assignment in grades K-6 and Form B for a teaching assignment in grades 7 and 8. Each form has different requirements in Section 3 to meet the state definition of HQT.

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    I currently hold a general education license in grades 1-8 (or K-8). How do I become HQT in grades 7 and 8 for the various content areas?

    You need to look at Form B section 3. The options to show evidence of your content knowledge for each content area of your assignment are listed on the forms (only one “yes” is required). If you are unable to mark at least one “yes” in section 3, you will need to move to Form B-Extended Options.

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    Does the Department place HQT status on my license?

    No, HQT status is not added to your certificate or license. Schools must verify and report HQT status as part of annual planning. Teachers must complete HQT forms and worksheets and a district or school designee shall retain these records.

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    I hold a valid early childhood license (PreK-3) and have passed the Praxis II Early Childhood exam #0021, or the OAE Early Childhood Education exam #012. What core content area areas am I highly qualified to teach?

    You are qualified to teach English language arts, reading, mathematics, science, government, civics, history, economics and geography.

    The EMIS Certification and Licensure dictionary reflects the following:

    Note that the general rule for elementary credentials [i.e., Kindergarten-Primary (KP), KindergartenElementary (KE), Elementary (EL), Early Childhood (EC)] allows the teachers who hold these credentials to teach any course within the relevant grade range. These situations are not reflected within the teaching certificate and license search tool. An exception to this rule is for those initially hired on or after July 1, 2013, to teach physical education. These teachers must be licensed in physical education and are included in this search tool

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    Are tutors required to be highly qualified when they are tutoring core academic subjects?

    Yes, per Ohio law (ORC 3319.09), tutors are considered teachers and would need to be HQT in the core academic subject(s) of their assignments.

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    How does the HQT definition pertain to special educators, gifted educators or intervention specialists?

    Special and gifted education teachers who provide instruction to students in core academic subjects must meet the highly qualified teacher requirements for each of those core academic subjects that they teach. These requirements apply whether the intervention specialist provides core academic instruction in an inclusion setting, a resource room or another setting.

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    Does a teacher of students with multiple handicaps or significant cognitive disabilities need to be highly qualified in grade 7-12 core academic content areas?

    Teachers and intervention specialists who teach students eligible for the alternate assessment in grades 7-12 need to be highly qualified in the core academic content areas of their teaching assignments. They report their HQT status on Form E. The Ohio Academic Content Standards-Extended provide access to Ohio’s Learning Standards in core academic content areas for grades K-12.

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    If an intervention specialist has taken the Teaching Reading exam and passed, is he or she eligible to be HQT in grades 7-12 English language arts?
    Yes. The appropriate exams to show content knowledge (Section 3) of intervention specialists for grades 7-12 English language arts are: Praxis II Teaching Reading Exam (#0204), Praxis II Introduction to the Teaching of Reading (#0200), or Ohio Assessments for Educators (OAE) Reading Subtest I (#038) and OAE Reading Subtest II (#039).

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    Do grades K-6 special education and gifted educators or intervention specialists need to show content knowledge (Section 3) for each core content area of their teaching assignments?

    No. They are required to pass one or more of Ohio’s state licensure exams (the Ohio Assessments for Educators, Praxis II or NTE) as indicated on Form D. It is not required that they pass all exams in all content areas in their teaching assignments. Alternately, if using the 90-clock hour option for meeting HQT, only one core content area or a combination is necessary for teaching all core content areas in grades K-6.

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For Paraprofessionals

    Are all paraprofessionals required to meet the state definition?

    All individuals providing instruction through Title I or schoolwide Title I programs that are paid for or targeted for support from Title I funding, must comply.
    Those not included:
    • Playground, bus and cafeteria aides;
    • Special education aides who attend only to the health care of students;
    • Translators;
    • Those whose sole responsibility consists of conducting parental involvement activities;
    • Those working in non-instructional roles (non-instructional computer assistance). 

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    Who is considered an instructional paraprofessional?

    An instructional paraprofessional provides one-on-one tutoring; assists with classroom management (organizing instructional and other materials); provides instructional computer assistance; provides support in a library or media center; or provides instructional services under the direct supervision of a teacher.

    Requirements do not apply to paraprofessionals working primarily as translators or solely on parental involvement activities, or to individuals working in non-instructional roles (food service, cafeteria or playground supervision, personal care service, and non-instructional computer assistance). 

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    What qualifications are required for instructional paraprofessionals?

    According to the regulations, instructional paraprofessionals who have instructional duties in Title I schoolwide buildings or are paid with Title I funds in a Title I targeted assistance building are required to meet the following criteria:

    1) Complete at least two years of study at an institution of higher education (defined as 48 semester or 72 quarter hours as verified by a college transcript from an accredited institution of higher education*); OR

    2) Obtain an associate (or higher) degree from an accredited institution of higher education (defined as an associate degree program from an accredited institution of higher education); OR

    3) Meet a rigorous standard of quality and demonstrate through a formal state or local academic assessment – (i) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing reading, writing and mathematics; or (ii) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in readiness for reading, writing and mathematics.

    * An accredited institution of higher education is defined in the Higher Education Act as an educational institution that is legally authorized by the State to provide a program of education beyond secondary education for which the institution awards a bachelor's degree or provides not less than a two-year program that is acceptable toward such a degree and is accredited at the college level by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education. If you are uncertain as to whether your degree or coursework is from an accredited higher education institution, please check with the institution

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    Do all instructional paraprofessionals, have to meet the educational requirements or just Title I instructional paraprofessionals?

    Education requirements impact only instructional paraprofessionals with instructional duties in a schoolwide Title I building or in any program supported by Title I funds.

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    Can instructional paraprofessionals be “grandfathered in” based on years of experience?

    No, there is no provision that exempts instructional paraprofessionals from federal requirements. 

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    What form of assessment will paraprofessionals be required to take?

    The Parapro Assessment focuses on one’s knowledge of, and ability to assist in instructing reading/reading readiness, writing/writing readiness, and mathematics/mathematics readiness. A passing score of 456 (out of a total of 480 possible points) must be obtained on the Parapro Assessment in order to meet the requirements. 

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    Where can I take the Paraprofessional Assessment?

    The Parapro Assessment is offered at Praxis testing centers. To register for the computer delivered Parapro Assessment, visit the Educational Testing Service Web site at http://www.ets.org/parapro/ . Online testing is available to districts as well. 

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    If a paraprofessional does not pass the test, can the test be taken again?

    Candidates may take the test as many times as necessary to achieve a passing score of 456 (out of a total of 480 possible points).

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    If a paraprofessional does not pass one section of the test, can that portion be taken again or must the entire test be completed?

    Because the Parapro Assessment is a single test, there is no way to “bank” scores on any single part of it; therefore, the entire test must be retaken. 

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    Are districts able to provide funding for paraprofessionals to meet the requirements?

    Primarily, Title I and Title II funds are used for ongoing training and professional development for paraprofessionals. However, other grants may apply such as IDEA, School Improvement, etc. 

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    Does a paraprofessional in a computer lab have to meet the paraprofessional definition?

    This depends upon the responsibilities assigned to the paraprofessional. If the paraprofessional has an instructional role, assisting students with academic content, they must meet the paraprofessional requirements for Title I schoolwide and targeted assistance buildings.

    However, if the paraprofessional is employed in a computer lab for maintenance, mechanical assistance or security responsibilities, the paraprofessional would not be considered to be serving in an instructional role and thus would not need to meet the requirements. 

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Last Modified: 2/6/2018 11:44:50 AM