Student Learning Objectives Overview

Implementation

Value-Added

Approved Vendor Assessments

Local Student Growth Measures

Shared Attribution

eTPES

Student Growth Measures for Principals

Student Growth Measures- General Information

Business Rules for Student Growth Measures

Implementation

Overview

Baseline and Trend Data

Student Population

Interval of Instruction

Standards and Content

Assessment(s)

Growth Targets

Rationale for Growth Targets

Student Growth Measures- General Information

Business Rules for Student Growth Measures


Implementation

    When looking at the graphic on the teacher performance side, it appears the evaluation system begins with student growth measures from the previous year. However, only a small percentage of teachers have student growth data (Value-Added) available going into the first year of implementation. What do the rest of the teachers use as the basis for their professional growth plan?

    In the first year of implementation, every teacher and principal starts on a professional growth plan (unless the teacher or principal is already on an improvement plan). Starting with a professional growth plan allows for comparability within buildings, districts and the entire state. Professional growth plans help teachers focus on areas of professional development that will enable them to improve their practice. If student growth data are available, they are part of the plan. However, completing the self-assessment enables teachers to identify professional goals in the initial and subsequent years. After the first year of implementation, all teachers and principals will have a professional growth plan or improvement plan based on their student growth measures.

    Back to Top


    Do all teachers in the same department or grade in a district have to use the same weighted percentage for growth measures?

    The district develops an overall plan (with input from teachers) for using student growth measures for evaluation. Whenever possible, the goal is district-wide consistency. However, there may be instances when certain teachers need different percentages (for example, in the case of a new teacher). The district ultimately makes this decision.

    Back to Top


    Will the Ohio Department of Education audit our district on our student growth measures process? What happens if our district or school is found inadequate?

    The department will randomly review districts and schools. If there are areas of concern, the department and the district or school may create a correction plan. The district or school must make the corrections identified in the plan.

    Educator Evaluation Process Review webpage

    Back to Top


    How will my student growth measures be determined if I’m responsible for multiple subjects?

    If you are a teacher with multiple subjects that have Value-Added data, you will receive a composite report. If you teach other non-Value-Added grades/subjects using approved vendor and/ or local measures, your data for growth measures should be proportional to your teaching schedule.

    Back to Top


    How will student growth measures be used for intervention specialists?

    For intervention specialists, the student growth measures depend on the availability of data. If you instruct students in grades/ subjects using the Value-Added progress dimension, you must complete the Roster Verification/Linkage process and may receive a Value-Added report. If you instruct grades/subjects that do not receive Value-Added reports, but your district or school uses an assessment on the Approved Vendor list, you must use data from those assessments. If neither is available, you will use the Student Learning Objective process and/or shared attribution with measures specific to your instructional setting. 

    In co-teaching situations, it is very important to link your students to you, the teacher, to be accurate.  For Value-Added reports, this linkage determines your student growth report information. A similar district-developed process is necessary to verify student rosters for the student growth measures data in situations using approved vendor assessments or local measures. 

    Back to Top


    How can I demonstrate growth for my gifted students when they are already high performing?

    Many gifted students enter school near, at, or above the proficient level. When no Value-Added or vendor assessment growth data are available, you will write student learning objectives. When writing student learning objectives, you will describe the specific student population and how this affects the establishment of growth targets. High achievement scores do not necessarily indicate progress, but gains do. Additionally, be certain to use assessments with “stretch” for the growth calculation. Stretch is where there are enough advanced knowledge/skill questions in assessments for these high-performing students to show achievement.

    Back to Top


    If I am an itinerant teacher, do I have student growth measures for teacher evaluation?

    Your district or school will evaluate all teachers under the evaluation model, unless the Business Rules for Student Growth Measures state otherwise. Therefore, your district or school needs to carefully review, on a case-by-case basis, whether each itinerant teacher meets the criteria stated in the Business Rules. Some of these criteria include a minimum of six students and meeting the locally determined minimum interval of instruction.  

    Back to Top


    How do I determine whether or not I have the required six or ten full-time equivalent students to generate a teacher-level Value-Added report?

    If you teach a Value-Added course, you should automatically link regardless of the number of students you instruct. To receive a teacher-level Value-Added report, you must link to the equivalent of at least six full-time students for 4-8 reading or math or ten full-time students in other state tested areas. After linking, you will receive scores for your students. The system determines the students who factor into the full-time equivalent and determines whether you meet the minimum full-time equivalent students.

    Back to Top


Value-Added

    If all the courses I teach are Value-Added, is my entire student growth measure comprised of teacher-level Value-Added data?

    Yes, if your schedule is comprised only of courses or subjects for which the Value-Added progress dimension is applicable, the entire student academic growth factor of the evaluation shall be based on the Value-Added progress dimension.                                                                                  

    If you are instructing Value-Added courses, but not exclusively, the student growth measure progress dimension shall be used in proportion to the part of your schedule of courses or subjects for which the dimension is applicable.

    Back to Top


    I am a teacher who has Value-Added data, but I also teach other non-Value-Added courses. My Value-Added data is from the year before. My district has determined that I can use local measures, too. Are the local measures from the current year or are the local measures from the same year as the Value-Added data?

    If you have Value-Added data available, then it must be used. Your district will decide if local student growth measures are used in combination with Value-Added data. A district might determine, as in this case, that your student growth measures will be the Value-Added data which is only available from the previous year and local measures, which are always from the current year.

    Back to Top


Approved Vendor Assessments

    If I have Value-Added data available, it must be used. However, what if I have an approved vendor assessment at my grade level? Does the vendor assessment count, too?

    The vendor assessment requirement is only when Value-Added data is not available. So for example, if you are a 4th-grade teacher instructing both science and math, you will have a Value-Added report for math. You also administer an approved vendor assessment for science and will receive a growth report from the vendor. In this case, you will only be required to use the Value-Added data. Your district may still choose to use the approved vendor data as a local measure in combination with the Value-Added data, if you do not exclusively instruct Value-Added courses. However, if you do not receive a Value-Added report but use an approved vendor assessment in the manner prescribed by the vendor, you must use the growth data provided.

    Back to Top


    Does my district have to purchase vendor assessments from the department’s approved list?

    Your district is not required to purchase approved vendor assessments. However, if you do not have Value-Added data and use an approved vendor assessment in accordance with the vendor’s guidelines and receive the vendor growth report, then the data from the vendor assessment must be used in your student growth measures calculation. If neither Value-Added nor approved vendor data are available, you will use the Student Learning Objective process with measures specific to your instructional setting.

    Back to Top


    How is the approved vendor assessment data entered into the electronic Teacher and Principal Evaluation System (eTPES)?

    Your district will receive your teacher-level growth report from the vendor that will include a 1-5 rating for student growth. This number must be entered into the electronic Teacher and Principal Evaluation System (eTPES) at the local level for each teacher with data from the approved vendor assessment.

    Back to Top


    If I am using an approved vendor assessment, do I need to write a student learning objective around it?

    No.  If you use an approved vendor assessment in accordance with the vendor’s guidelines and receive the vendor growth report, this report will provide a 1-5 rating for you.  It is a district decision to combine local student growth measures, such as student learning objectives, in content areas not measured by the approved vendor assessment. 

    Back to Top


Local Student Growth Measures

    What are the options for local student growth measures?

    There are three types of local student growth measures that show your effect on student learning:

    1. Student Learning Objectives
    2. Shared Attribution
    3. Approved Vendor Assessments (for Category A teachers)

    Back to Top


    What are Student Learning Objectives?

    The Student Learning Objective is a process to identify and use measures that are specific to relevant subject matter. Measures for student learning objectives must be district-approved and may include:

    • District-approved, locally developed assessments
    • Pre/Post assessments
    • Performance-based assessments
    • Portfolios
    • Vendor assessments not on the Ohio Department of Education’s approved list.

    Student learning objectives demonstrate a teacher’s impact on student learning within a given interval of instruction. Student learning objectives also contribute to distinguishing between effective and ineffective teaching. Ohio has developed clear guidance documents for districts and schools on developing, approving and scoring student learning objectives.

    Back to Top


Shared Attribution

    What is shared attribution?

    Shared attribution is an optional local student growth measure that can be attributed to a group of teachers. It encourages collaborative goals and may be used as data in the student growth component of teacher and principal evaluations.

    Back to Top


    What are some examples of shared attribution that our district or school may choose to use?

    Shared attribution measures may include:

    • Building or District Value-Added is recommended if available;
    • Building teams (such as content area) may utilize a composite Value-Added score;
    • Building- or District-based student learning objectives.

    Back to Top


    Will Shared Attribution scores be pre-loaded into the electronic Teacher and Principal Evaluation System?

    No.  Since districts and schools determine the percentage they will assign to the shared attribution and which measure of shared attribution will be used (i.e. district, building or department level Value-Added), shared attribution scores are manually entered.

    Back to Top


    What are the pros and cons to using shared attribution?

    By choosing to use a measure that can be attributed to a group or the entire staff, many districts aim to encourage collaboration among staff. However, districts and schools must also consider that you and many teachers evaluated by this data may not be directly involved in establishing the score, i.e. high school teachers and special areas.  Furthermore, a shared measure is not a true picture of your impact on the students you instruct. For these reasons, the department recommends that districts using shared attribution as a local growth measure in teacher evaluation should consider keeping the weighted percentage low (between 5-10% or at least less than half of the student growth measure).

    Back to Top


eTPES

    What is eTPES and are district and schools required to use it?

    eTPES is the electronic Teacher and Principal Evaluation System. This is an online system open to all Ohio districts and schools. All traditional public schools, JVSDs and Educational Service Centers are required to use the system. Here is more detailed information. Scroll down the page to Ohio eTPES.

     

     

    Back to Top


Student Growth Measures for Principals

    What are the student growth measures for principals?

    Student growth measures account for 50% of a principal's evaluation. Principals may utilize data from value-added, vendor assessments and local measures.

    Back to Top


Student Growth Measures- General Information

    I need more information on student growth measures. Where do I find that information?

    Here is a link on the Ohio Department of Education’s website that includes an overview of student growth measures, the department-approved list of assessments, student learning objectives information and tools, and steps for designing local student growth plans for evaluation.  Additional information is added to this part of our website regularly. 

    Back to Top


Business Rules for Student Growth Measures

    This document frequently cites the Rules for Student Growth Measures. Where can I find these rules?

    You can find the Business Rules for Student Growth Measures here.

    Back to Top


Implementation

    Do all teachers have to write student learning objectives?

    No. Teachers can use student learning objectives as part of their student growth measures per the district plan.

    Back to Top


    Does the Department approve the student learning objectives?

    The Department will not collect or approve student learning objectives at the state level. It recommends that an existing district or building committee become trained to review, provide feedback, and ultimately approve student learning objectives. The composition of this approval committee is a local decision.

    Back to Top


    How many student learning objectives do I have to write?

    If you are using student learning objectives as a growth measure, the Department recommends a minimum of two and recommends no more than four which are representative of your schedule and student population, but only one is required.

    Back to Top


    Do I have to write a student learning objective for each course that I teach?

    Not necessarily. The student learning objectives should be representative of your teaching schedule and student population. Whenever feasible, all students you instruct should be covered by a student learning objective. Within the guideline of two to four student learning objectives, it is a local decision as to the exact number you will write and which courses should be covered. For example, for a self-contained 3rd grade teacher who instructs all four core subjects, a district may make a local decision to focus student learning objectives on reading and math only.

    Back to Top


    What is the average length of a student learning objective?

    The length is not the important factor. Quality over quantity is the consideration. The focus of the student learning objective is on the content. When writing the student learning objective, you should use the provided checklist to ensure it contains all of the required information needed for approval at the local level.  

    Back to Top


Overview

    What is a Student Learning Objective?

    A Student Learning Objective (SLO) is a measurable, long-term academic growth target that a teacher sets at the beginning of the year for all students or for subgroups of students. SLOs demonstrate a teacher’s impact on student learning within a given interval of instruction based upon baseline data gathered at the beginning of the course. Each SLO includes:

    • The baseline and trend data;
    • The student population or sample included in the objective;
    • The period of time covered by the SLO;
    • The standards the SLO will align with;
    • The assessments that will be used to measure student progress;
    • The expected student growth; and
    • The rationale for the expected student growth.

    Back to Top


    What does a high-quality SLO look like?

    High-quality SLOs state clearly which students are included in the learning objective, how growth will be measured over what time period, and why that level of growth should be expected of those students. High-quality SLOs include the following:

    • The baseline and trend data.  The SLO data should summarize student information, identify student strengths and weaknesses, and review trend data to inform the objective and establish the amount of growth that should take place.
    • The student population or student subgroup included in the objective. Every student should be covered by at least one SLO to ensure that no group of students is overlooked.
    • The period of time covered by the SLO. The SLO should note the period of instruction used to meet the goal (i.e., quarter, semester or an entire year); this period of instruction should be the length of the course. Depending on the length of the instruction period, teachers also should include timeframes for mid-year assessments of progress so that they can adjust instruction or, in some cases, modify SLOs as needed.
    • The standards the SLO addresses. SLOs should link to specific national or state standards for the grade or content area.
    • The assessment(s) used. The SLO should include assessments both to track student progress and make midcourse corrections (formative), and to indicate if the objective was met (summative).
    • The expected student growth within that period. The target for student growth should be realistic yet challenging. It also should include how growth will be measured.
    • The rationale for the expected student growth. High-quality SLOs include strong justifications for why the goal is important and achievable for this group of students. Rationales should draw upon assessment data, student outcomes, and curriculum standards.

    High-quality SLOs specify measurable goals that are ambitious, yet attainable. SLOs should be broad enough to represent the most important learning or overarching skills, but narrow enough to measure. When possible, SLOs should align with Ohio's Learning Standards.

    Back to Top


    What are the benefits of using SLOs?

    The SLO process reinforces best teaching practices and encourages educators to ensure that their students will be college and career ready. Teachers using best practices already follow an informal SLO process: They set goals for their students, use data to assess student progress and adjust their instruction based upon that progress. Thus, the SLO process provides teachers with ways to formalize their teaching practice, give input on how student learning will be measured and how they will be evaluated.

    Unlike some other measures of teacher effectiveness, all school personnel can set SLOs because the ability to create SLOs does not depend upon the availability of standardized assessment scores. The SLO process allows all educators to focus on the specific objectives they want to achieve with their students and measure student growth using measures that are most relevant for their student population and content areas. SLOs enable all educators to demonstrate their impact on student learning and receive recognition for their efforts. 

    Back to Top


    What will the SLO process look like?

    LEAs have some flexibility to shape the process to fit local contexts, but ODE recommends the following steps:

    STEP 1:  Gather and review available data

    STEP 2:  Determine the interval of instruction and identify content

    STEP 3:  Choose assessments and set the growth target(s)

    STEP 4:  Submit your SLO and prepare for review and approval

    STEP 5:  Final scoring of the SLO

    Back to Top


Baseline and Trend Data

    The baseline and trend data section is sometimes written vaguely using "most," "several," and "struggled". Is this acceptable?

    If used alone, vague words like those mentioned in the question above are insufficient to describe baseline data.  Whenever possible, the description of the baseline and trend data should include student performance data, such as a table showing the range and frequency of student scores.  You should make written observations based on the data in this section. However, there must be data included.

    Back to Top


    What if my data are unrelated to my subject or do not exist?

    All teachers can find data relevant to their course. The rare exception to this may be a first year teacher or a teacher new to a course.  Data may be from related subjects if the subject is new to students. For example, biology teachers may glean useful information from reviewing last year’s environmental science examination. In addition, although students may not have received formal instruction in a subject, students may have background knowledge acquired from outside the school setting. A brief survey could also provide information about students’ background knowledge. You should use the first couple of weeks to gather data about your students.  During this time, give a pre-assessment or the first chapter or unit exam to provide valuable data for the student learning objective.

    Back to Top


    Should student learning objectives be based on data from standardized tests or teacher-created assessments?

    Student learning objectives should be based on data from multiple sources when available such as standardized tests, portfolios of student work, and district-created assessments.

    Back to Top


    Can I use data that is two or three years old?

    Yes. Using performance data from multiple years can provide valuable information. For example, trend data may show that students in your class for the past three years struggled with converting fractions. Based upon this finding, you might include this skill in your student learning objective and then seek new instructional strategies for teaching fractions.

    Back to Top


    Do I create student learning objectives after the school year has started and after I have given assessments to determine a baseline?

    Student learning objectives are typically developed after the school year has begun so that you can use your diagnostics or pre-assessments to develop the student learning objectives.  However, sections of the student learning objective, such as “standards and content” and “assessment,” may be completed prior to the start of the school year.

    Back to Top


    Should I use prior content or current content to create baseline data?

    Your baseline data will vary based on the subject and the availability of data.  You may use a pre-assessment as a source of baseline data.  The pre-assessment will contain the content and skills to be taught during the upcoming year.  Other sources of data are end-of-course assessments from the prior year, which are not being based on the current content but may be good proxies for the current course.

    Back to Top


Student Population

    How do I determine the student population? What portion of my student population or roster do I include?

    The student population includes all the students enrolled in a course whenever possible.  An additional “focused” or “targeted” student learning objective may be created for a subgroup of students within the course who need targeted assistance. At least one of your student learning objectives should cover all the students enrolled in a course except in rare cases when you may have a very large student population. 

    Back to Top


    Can I exclude students with disabilities from my student learning objective?

    Difficulty in achieving the targets is not a reason to exclude any subgroup of students.

    Back to Top


    What if a student joins my class late in the year or withdraws from my class early?

    The expectation is that all students entering a course throughout the year receive a pre-assessment to determine any gaps in learning.  Every effort should be made to administer the post-assessment to each student enrolled in the course. These data are extremely beneficial to the next year’s teacher.  The Department expects each district to determine the minimum interval of instruction for student learning objectives. Understandably, you and your principal will need to discuss whether certain students meet these minimum requirements determined by your district. 

    Back to Top


    What if students in my student population are absent frequently? Will they be excluded from the calculation of my student learning objective score?

    Currently, per Ohio law, students who have 45 or more unexcused or excused absences for the full academic year are excluded from final calculations of your score for Value-Added.  Districts should remove students with 45 or more unexcused or excused absences from their Approved Vendor Assessment and local measures.  Additionally, for student learning objectives, districts should utilize the relevant interval of instruction as defined by the district.

    Back to Top


    What happens if I teach a class where my students change on a regular basis? What if I have different students every quarter or every few weeks?

    The Department expects each district to determine the minimum interval of instruction for student learning objectives. It is understood that you and your principal will need to discuss whether certain students meet these minimum requirements.  Therefore, this situation requires some flexibility within the district’s student growth measure plan because your schedule and assignment may require adaptions to the student learning objective process. Adaptations can be put in place to make the process work for you. The danger is that some students are not included in the student learning objective. Teachers, principals, and districts should try to avoid this. Remember that you should strive to show growth in as many students as possible. You should avoid any situations that exclude particular students who are low or high performing.

    If you are a teacher who sees students for various lengths of time and at various points throughout the year, you can design a student learning objective around big ideas and content. Then you establish tiered targets based on the amount of time a student receives instruction.  Expectations for students who are in the course for longer periods of time should be different than those for students on shorter intervals.  This means that you should keep a roster of all students, possibly sorted by length of instruction throughout the school year.

    Back to Top


    How do I write a student learning objective as a teacher of 450 students?

    In cases where a teacher has large student populations, it is recommended that the district plan guides the administration and you to focus the student learning objective in a manner that encompasses as many students as possible.  The district plan should strive for comparability and consistency across subject and grade levels regarding the total number of student learning objectives per teacher as well as the size of the student population.

    Back to Top


Interval of Instruction

    Is the interval of instruction one curriculum unit or the entire school year?

    Match the interval of instruction with the length of the course.  This may be a year, semester, trimester, or a quarter.  Districts with buildings using intervals of instruction other than a typical school year will need multiple approval periods for their student learning objectives.  For instance, in a high school using semesters, the approval committee would meet both at the beginning of the school year and again at the new semester to approve student learning objectives for their teachers.

    Back to Top


    My school year ends on June 1. Does this mean my interval of instruction for my yearlong course ends on June 1?

    No.  State law requires the completion of the evaluation process by May 1. The Department recommends that you administer your post-assessments on or around April 15. This will allow adequate time to score the assessments, complete the Student Learning Objective Scoring Template, and submit the data to the evaluator by May 1.  

    Back to Top


    I am a high school teacher instructing Algebra II in a year-long course. I also teach Trigonometry first semester and Calculus second semester. My district has decided all high school teachers will write only two student learning objectives. How do I decide on which courses to focus my two student learning objectives?

    If you instruct large numbers of courses, the district plan should guide the administration to work with you to identify the required courses as a focus for the student learning objectives.  If this does not help narrow the focus to the required number of student learning objectives, the focus should next be on the courses with the highest student enrollment. The district plan should strive for comparability and consistency among teachers across subjects and grade levels regarding the total number of required student learning objectives.

    Back to Top


Standards and Content

    Should student learning objectives be aligned primarily to course curriculum or Ohio's Learning Standards?

    Align student learning objectives in the following order:

    1. Ohio's Learning Standards
    2. National standards put forth by education organizations 

    Back to Top


    Can I list the standards in the Standards and Content section or do I need to write a narrative?

    You can list the standards in this section, but you also need to articulate the content of the standards. For example, simply listing “Grade 4 ELA Writing 2a” is not enough information. In this section you will need to explain the core knowledge and skills students must attain and why you identified those standards as the most important.

    Back to Top


    Should student learning objectives cover multiple standards or just one?

    You must have at least one student learning objective that covers the overarching standards that represent the breadth of the course.  For example, if the course is a year-long course, the standards and content section must reflect the overarching standards for that year-long course.  Once this course-level student learning objective is in place, you may then choose to write a targeted student learning objective, in which you focus on a subgroup of students (the low-achieving, for example) and also narrow the content to only those standards that these students have yet to master.

    Back to Top


Assessment(s)

    What is stretch?

    To have sufficient stretch, an assessment must contain questions that vary in difficulty. The assessment should contain both basic and advanced knowledge and skill questions so that both low-performing and high-performing students can demonstrate growth.

    Back to Top


    Is it the intent of the student learning objective process to use the same instrument for pre-assessment and post-assessment to accurately measure student growth?

    Using the same instrument as a pre- and post-assessment is not ideal. In fact, using the same assessment multiple times within the same year may decrease the validity of results since students will have seen the questions before.  A well-written pre-assessment (used in conjunction with other forms of baseline data) can be a valuable source of data, because it should closely align with the post-assessment to measure growth. Pre-assessments should assess the same general content as the post-assessment, be comparable in rigor, and should be reviewed by content experts for validity and reliability.

    Back to Top


    What types of assessments can be used with student learning objectives?
    • District-approved, locally developed assessments
    • Pre/Post assessments
    • Performance-based assessments
    • Portfolios
    • Vendor assessments not on the ODE approved list

    Back to Top


    Should all accommodations/modifications for students with disabilities be included in this section?

    The Student Learning Objective Template Checklist does not specify that accommodations/modifications must be listed in the assessment section. However, articulating that accommodations/modifications are being provided to your students in accordance with their IEPs is an important fact as it demonstrates knowledge of your students.

    Back to Top


    Do teachers grade the assessments?

    This is a local decision. It might be useful to consider grading tests in teams so you are grading your colleagues’ students, not your own students. Collaborative grading is used in many schools with established student learning objectives. Your district may wish to address this issue in the local Student Growth Measures Plan.

    Back to Top


    How do I know that my teacher-designed assessments are valid and reliable?

    It is certainly more challenging to determine if a teacher-designed assessment is valid and reliable.  However, districts can put procedures in place to help increase assessment validity and reliability. Using the checklist provided by the Department in the Guidance on Selecting Assessments for Student Learning Objectives is a good first step.  In addition, having content and assessment experts from the district or the local Educational Service Center review the assessments can help ensure that tests capture the information needed about student performance and are fair to all students. Standardized scoring procedures can also increase a test’s validity and reliability. 

    Back to Top


    Can I create the assessment for my student learning objective?

    The Department strongly advises against an individual teacher creating an assessment. In rare cases where a team of teachers cannot create an assessment, you should develop the assessment in conjunction with an instructional coach, curriculum supervisor, special education teacher, English Language Learner teacher, and administrator or other faculty member with assessment expertise.

    Back to Top


    Can I use my quarterly assessments or my mid-term exam as part of my post-assessment?

    This is not acceptable as it would not meet the requirement for demonstrating growth between two points in time.  If the student learning objective content covers an entire semester or year, the pre- and post-assessment should also cover the same content for the entire semester or year.  Using quarterly assessments would only assess the content for the quarter.  Since the student learning objective covers much more content than a quarter, it is not acceptable to use these assessments as pre and post-assessments.  These assessments would simply be used as formative checks for you to determine whether your students are making appropriate progress toward their established growth targets at the end of the course.  You can modify various questions from each of these assessments to create an overall pre- and post-assessment that would indeed measure the content for the entire course. 

    Back to Top


    What if the pre-assessment used in the submitted student learning objective is not very strong?

    This is a learning process.  Evaluators can suggest how to improve the pre-assessment for next year.  The goal is to learn from the process in these early years.  Districts and schools should have clear expectations regarding assessments to ensure quality pre- and post-assessments.

    Back to Top


Growth Targets

    Will all growth targets be tiered?

    Instances may exist where one growth target may be acceptable for all students, but this is rare.  For example, you may have a small course, such as an honors seminar, in which students start the year with similar background knowledge and skill sets.  In this situation, one growth target for all students may be appropriate.  The Department recommends setting tiered growth targets to ensure you are addressing the needs of both the high- and low-performing students. Ultimately, every student will have a target within the established tiers.

    Back to Top


    If a student is well below proficiency level, is it appropriate to set a growth target of proficiency?

    Targets should first be developmentally appropriate and then rigorous and attainable. Expecting a student to grow from below basic to proficient in one year may be very difficult.  However, in some cases, more than a year’s worth of growth is necessary to close the achievement gap.  The student learning objective process asks you to set high expectations for students and to establish these targets based upon the analysis of baseline data. You should consult with colleagues, curriculum directors, administrators, and instructional coaches when determining appropriate growth targets.

    Back to Top


    At what point can a teacher revise his or her growth targets?

    In most cases, you cannot revise growth targets once the student learning objective has been approved.  If students are showing greater than expected progress, the teacher can extend the assessment to more fully capture the extent of student growth. However, the growth targets do not change.  Similarly, if a student is not making sufficient progress toward his or her growth target, you can alter or supplement the instructional strategies. But, again, the growth target does not change. In some extenuating circumstances, such as after a natural disaster, outbreak of serious illness, or an unplanned extended absence, you may be able to revise your student learning objective with district approval.

    Back to Top


    How will the Ohio Department of Education and districts ensure that growth targets are rigorous across schools?

    The review and approval process helps ensure rigor and comparability at the local level.  The Department recommends those approving student learning objectives complete a calibration process to ensure all team members are upholding rigorous standards for every student learning objective within the district.  The state will monitor the implementation of student learning objectives by conducting random audits.

    Back to Top


Rationale for Growth Targets

    I feel like I am repeating a lot of information when I attempt to complete the Rationale for Growth Targets section. Am I doing this wrong?

    Rationales must include strong justifications for why the growth targets are appropriate and achievable for the student population, and, therefore, must be based on student data and the content of the student learning objective.  The rationale ties everything together, and, as a result, it touches on every component that came before it.  Rationales explain why this learning is important by making connections to school and district goals.

    Back to Top


Student Growth Measures- General Information

    I need more information on student growth measures. Where do I find that information?

    Click here for the Department's student growth measures webpage. It includes the Department approved list of assessments, student learning objectives information and tools, and steps for  designing local student growth measures plans for evaluation.  Information is added to the website regularly.  

    Back to Top


Business Rules for Student Growth Measures

    I need more information on the Business Rules for Student Growth Measures. Where do I find that information?

    The Business Rules for Student Growth Measures addresses technical questions about Student Growth Measures, including those regarding teachers with highly mobile student populations or extremely high or low numbers of students. Districts and schools should assume all teachers included in the new evaluation system, per state law, will have growth measures unless these business rules state otherwise.  Click here to visit the business rules.

    Back to Top


Last Modified: 10/23/2014 10:14:42 AM