Ohio Graduation Tests FAQs

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Office of Curriculum and Assessment

(P) 614-466-1317

Ohio Graduation Tests FAQs

Ohio Graduation Tests (OGT) are a key part of Ohio’s education reform to establish an aligned system of standards, assessments and accountability for Ohio schools. The testing requirements were established by the Ohio General Assembly in 2001 based on recommendations by the Governor's Commission for Student Success. Tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies make up the OGT.

General Questions


General Questions

    What are the purposes of the Ohio Graduation Tests?

    The purposes of the OGT are to:

    • Ensure that students who receive a high school diploma demonstrate at least high school levels of achievement;
    • Measure the level of reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies skills expected of students at the end of the 10th grade;
    • Meet federal requirement for high school testing.

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    What time of year do students take the OGT?

    Students take the OGT for the first time in the spring of their sophomore year. Students can continue to take the tests in the fall and spring of their junior and senior years and during the summer.

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    What happens if students don’t pass the tests the first time?

    Students who do not pass one or more tests on their first attempt will retake the tests they need to pass during their junior and senior years. Ohio Graduation Tests are administered each fall and spring, with an optional summer administration available within some school districts.

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    Where can I find answers about the Ohio Graduation Test transition for the 2013-2014 school year?

     

    One component of the transition from the 2001-2002 Academic Content Standards to Ohio’s New Learning Standards is the dual alignment of the Ohio Achievement Assessments (OAA) and the Ohio Graduation Test (OGT) for the 2013-2014 school year. The document below answers some frequently asked questions about this dual alignment.

    FAQs on Ohio Graduation Test transition for the 2013-2014 school year

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    Who develops the OGT tests?

    Ohio teachers and other educators, parents, representatives of the business community and other citizens are involved with Ohio Department of Education staff and its testing contractor in developing questions for the OGT. The law requiring Ohio Graduation Tests clearly states that parents, classroom teachers, other school personnel and administrators must be involved in developing the tests.

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    How do we know OGT tests are fair?

    A Content Advisory Committee, made up of parents, educators and others, reviews all test questions. Another committee, the Fairness Sensitivity Review Committee, has been trained to review questions to ensure that the questions are not biased in any way. This group, also comprised of parents, educators and others, ensures that test questions are fair and do not promote or inquire as to an individual’s moral or social values or beliefs. Committee members represent a broad base of diverse backgrounds, organizations and school districts. Each of the committees review questions prior to field testing and again after field testing where data on the question performance are available. Questions must be accepted by both committees prior to the question appearing on any test for which a student is held accountable.

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    How many questions are on the OGT tests?

    OGT tests have approximately 35 multiple-choice questions and up to eight constructed (written) response questions.

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    How long will students have to take the tests?

    Students have up to two and one-half hours to take each of the tests.

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    Are the Ohio Graduation Tests strictly multiple-choice questions?

    The OGT includes questions other than multiple-choice questions. Students have to write responses to some questions.

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    Are there other ways for students to receive a diploma if they don’t pass the OGT?

     

     

     

    Students may graduate and receive a diploma without passing all five tests of the OGT if they meet the following requirements:

    • Pass four of the five tests and have missed passing the fifth test by no more than 10 scale score points;
    • Have had a 97 percent attendance rate each of the last four years and must not have had an expulsion in the last four years;
    • Have a grade point average of 2.5 out of 4.0 in the subject area missed and have completed the curriculum requirement in the subject area missed;
    • Have participated in any intervention programs offered by the school and must have had a 97 percent attendance rate in any program offered outside the normal school day or year, including those offered by someone other than the school;
    • Obtain letters of recommendation from each teacher in the subject area not yet passed and the high school principal. 

    For more detailed information, please see Alternative Pathway for Eligibility for a Diploma

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    Do exceptional children and English-limited students have to pass the OGT?

    Students whose Individual Education Plan (IEP) excuses them from the consequence of having to pass the OGT may be awarded a diploma. However, federal law (Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002) requires every student to take the OGT or an alternate assessment. English-limited students, (those students whose primary language is not English) also must achieve the specified scores on the OGT in order to be awarded a diploma.

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    What happens to students who need a different type of test because of their Individual Education Plan (IEP)?

    Students who have an IEP that requires a different test can take an alternate assessment of the OGT.

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    Do charter school students and those in other schools have to take the OGT?

    Chartered nonpublic school students and students in Schools for the Blind and the Deaf must pass the OGT or satisfy the alternative conditions set by the state to receive a high school diploma.

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    What happens to students who have met all of the curriculum requirements for graduation but do not pass the OGT before their intended date of graduation?

    Students who have met all of the curriculum requirements for graduation but have not passed all required parts of the OGT before their intended date of graduation will not graduate with their classmates. School districts decide locally whether or not students may participate in graduation ceremonies.

    Students may continue to take the OGT until they pass all required parts, which would then allow them to earn their diplomas. The first opportunity to take the test after their senior year would be in June during the summer administration of the OGT. Students should contact a school district well in advance of the test dates to learn of the requirements to sit for the test. Students who are eligible may test during any of the testing opportunities throughout the school year – March, June and October. Click here for test dates.

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Last Modified: 10/25/2013 3:02:48 PM