Career Tech FAQs

CTE - Important questions & answers


CTE - Important questions & answers

    What is the difference between career-technical education (CTE) and workforce development (WFD)?

    CTE is the umbrella term for all courses, programs and initiatives that are part of career-tech, including OhioMeansJobs K12, Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS), Career-Based Intervention (CBI) and High Schools That Work (HSTW). WFD, which is the largest subset under CTE, are pathways and programs designed to prepare students for careers in pathways and programs within one of 15 different career fields.

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    What is the difference between a CTE workforce development program and a CTE workforce development course?

    A WFD program consists of multiple courses, is at least 450 hours in length, and includes exploration and work experience to prepare students for further study and a career in their chosen career field. A WFD course addresses some of the content standards of a WFD program and in general contains content provided in a shorter time period (e.g. 60-280 hours).

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    What is the difference between career-technical education and other more traditional education?

    Increasingly, many CTE methods and strategies of learning in the context of the real world are being applied in traditional education courses. The key difference is with consistency around the word “both.” CTE programs are designed to help students meet both academic (mathematics, English Language Arts, science, etc.) and career field technical content standards with real-work experience. The technical content standards are revised, generally every five years, by panels of educators and business/industry representatives, and are embedded with the academic content standards.

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    If a school/district wants to start a secondary Ohio career-tech workforce development education program, when should planning start?

    Allow at least 18 months for planning and action prior to having the first students enrolled in the program.

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    What is the first recommended step to start a new program?

    Alignment with business/industry need now and for the future is the first and most important determining factor when starting a new WFD program. Nationally and in Ohio, WFD is provided within 16 career fields, including the areas of art/communication, agriculture, business, construction, finance, education, engineering, health, hospitality, cosmetology, information technology, public safety, manufacturing, transportation and marketing. Four parts of alignment with workforce development needs are outlined in a CTE/Tech Prep expectations document.

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    What are the other steps to starting an Ohio secondary WFD program?

    All new WFD programs must have a qualified teacher, the right equipment and facility, a linkage with one of Ohio’s CTPDs and all of the Program of Study components. More details about quality programming are on the Web. The forms to apply for program approval are called CTE-26 applications. Ohio workforce development program in a high school/career center must be at least 450 hours in a year.

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    Do districts need a Program of Study (POS) for every school in the CTPD?

    The FY2012 requirement is a minimum of one POS for each program, regardless of where it is housed. In FY2013, when all WFD programs will be Tech Prep, all must have a POS.

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    Is a POS needed for every college used for articulation with a program?

    No. The current requirement is for a minimum of one postsecondary POS for each secondary WFD program.

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    How many students are needed to have a secondary CTE program?

    The minimum number of students depends on the program and the school district. This is a local decision. For some programs, student-teacher ratio with equipment is a factor. Cost effectiveness is another factor.

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    What happens when the state eliminates a CTE course or program, and how does this impact the program status and teacher?

    The Office of CTE gives school districts a one- or two-year notice about the planned elimination of a CTE course (subject code) or CTE program, with guidance on how to transition the course or program. The transitioned CTE course(s) or program is based on different CTE technical content standards, so the local curriculum must be updated, and the teacher should obtain professional development and re-licensure as needed. The teacher may have professional work experience in the new career technical field and may be able to add a licensure area to their existing license.

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    How do community schools report CTE data?

    All community school data are reported in EMIS, the same as any other district would report data, and this data serves as the basis for each community school’s Local Report Card. The process depends on whether a community school student is enrolled in a WFD or CTE program through a CTPD or if the community school has its own approved and funded WFD/CTE program.

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    How can local districts provide input on quality programming?

    There are many opportunities to provide input, including the development of technical content standards and the creation of technical assessments. Those wishing to participate or suggest a business/industry or other partner for participation should contact the pathway consultants.

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Last Modified: 10/21/2019 3:58:56 PM