Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener (OELPS) FAQ

Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener (OELPS) FAQ

These are answers to the most frequently asked questions received by the Ohio Department of Education regarding the Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener (OELPS).

Note: Throughout the frequently asked questions, the term “districts” refers to public school districts and community schools.
 

Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener for the beginning of kindergarten (OELPS-BK)

General Questions

OELPS Format

English Learner Identification

Student Participation

Administration

Accessibility and Accommodations

Manuals

Test Blueprint

Practice Test

Test Security

Scoring and Reporting

Technology

Professional Development


Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener for the beginning of kindergarten (OELPS-BK)

    What is the OELPS-BK?
    The OELPS-BK is the Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener for the Beginning of Kindergarten. The Ohio Department of Education has implemented a new proficiency definition for kindergarteners taking the OELPS in the beginning of the kindergarten year. Kindergarteners taking the OELPS before Dec. 31 each school year will be proficient (not an English learner) if they earn scores of 3 or higher in all non-exempt domains of the screener. Students taking the kindergarten OELPS after Jan. 1 each school year will be proficient if they earn scores of 4 or higher in all non-exempt domains of the screener. The Department made this enhancement beginning with the 2021-2022 school year, in response to stakeholder feedback and three years of screener results data that indicated the kindergarten screener was too difficult for students beginning kindergarten.
     

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    Are the OELPS-BK test items different from the OELPS test items?
    No. The OELPS-BK items are the same as the kindergarten OELPS test items. Test items for both tests are chosen from the same item bank. There is no visible difference between the OELPS-BK and the OELPS; only the definition of proficiency is different.
     

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    Does the student need to be prepared for the OELPS-BK?
    No. There is no change in the administration for the student who takes the screener in the one-to-one test administration format.
     

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    Are there special versions for the OELPS-BK?
    Yes. There are paper, large-print and Braille versions.
     

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    Are there changes in the procedures for the OELPS-BK?
    No. All procedures, such as administration, accommodations, scoring, reporting and test security are the same as for the kindergarten OELPS.
     

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    Are the OELPS-BK and the Kindergarten OELPS available at the same time?
    No. The OELPS-BK is available at the beginning of the school year through Dec. 31. The kindergarten OELPS is available Jan. 1 through the end of the test window.
     

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    When the test administrator logs in to the system, is it necessary to choose either the OELPS-BK or the kindergarten OELPS?
    No. The time of year determines which OELPS will be available when the test administrator logs in to set up the test session for the student.
     

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    Are the grade bands 1-12 affected by the change in the proficiency definition?
    No. The kindergarten OELPS is the only grade band affected. The grade bands 1-12 are scored using the proficient definition of 4s and 5s in the non-exempt domain scores.
     

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General Questions

    What is the Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener (OELPS)?
    The OELPS is a diagnostic assessment of English language proficiency administered to identify English learners. It measures a student’s English skills in four language domains: listening, reading, writing and speaking. The OELPS is the only approved assessment tool by which public districts identify English learners in Ohio. The OELPS meets the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirement of a standardized English learner entrance procedure.

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    Should a situation occur in which the OELPS is not available, what assessment tool should be used for the English learner identification?
    A district could administer an English language proficiency screener in situations when the OELPS is unavailable locally. However, when the OELPS is available, any student screened with the temporary procedure also would be screened with the OELPS. The OELPS is the only assessment tool which officially identifies students as English learners in Ohio. Assessment accommodations for students taking Ohio’s State Tests, such as translators, are for officially identified English learners only.

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    How was the OELPS developed?
    The OELPS was developed by a group of states that worked together through English Language Proficiency Assessment for the 21st Century (ELPA21). ELPA21 member states developed a summative assessment (OELPA) and a diagnostic screener (OELPS) through a federal Enhanced Assessment Grant. The seven collaborating ELPA21 states are: Arkansas, Iowa, Louisiana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oregon and West Virginia. OELPS is Ohio’s title for the ELPA21 Dynamic Screener administered in the other ELPA21 states. The states are developing a summative English language proficiency assessment for English learners with the most significant cognitive disabilities. The new assessment is the Alternate Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (Alt-OELPA).

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    Which schools must administer the OELPS?
    When screening is necessary, public-school districts including community schools must administer the OELPS to identify English learners. Chartered nonpublic schools are not required to administer the OELPS but may do so at no charge. If a chartered nonpublic school decides to administer the OELPS, it must follow all testing rules.

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    Must chartered nonpublic schools participate in Title III programs to administer the OELPS?
    Whether a chartered nonpublic school participates in the OELPS may depend on its participation in the federal Title III Language Instruction for English Learners and Immigrant Students grant program
     
    Chartered nonpublic schools participating in the federal Title III program should consult with their Title III public district to determine whether the OELPS will be administered to identify English learners. Chartered nonpublic schools not participating in the Title III grant program have the option to participate in the OELPS.  
     
    Students who attend a chartered nonpublic school and receive a scholarship (Ed Choice or Jon Peterson) are not required to be screened using the OELPS, unless the school is participating in the federal Title III program and officials have agreed to use the OELPS as the English learner screener.

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    Is the OELPS an approved option for a diagnostic assessment in Kindergarten through grade 3?
    No, the OELPS and the Diagnostic Assessments serve different purposes. The OELPS may not be substituted for the Diagnostic Assessment. More information about Diagnostic Assessments is available on the Department website.

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OELPS Format

    What is the design of the OELPS?
    The OELPS is intended as an online test for all potential English learners. Ohio allows paper tests as an accommodation for specific preapproved situations

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    Is preapproval from the Department required to use the paper test?

    Yes. The OELPS paper test is available for students who cannot test online. All districts must schedule time and provide technology appropriate for their local situations. The following are situations when districts may be eligible for the paper test(s): 

    • A district with students who require the paper test as an accommodation documented in an individualized educational program (IEP) or 504 plan or due to a student’s religious beliefs; or 

    • A district that lacks the required technology infrastructure to test all students online, including schools that are new to state testing and verify a lack of technology to test all students online; or experience a change in the district’s or school’s technology system that impacts capacity to test all students online. 

    Districts must contact the Ohio Department of Education at statetests@education.ohio.gov to start the process of determining eligibility for an exception to online testing. Once approved, the Office of Assessment places orders with the vendor for the paper tests.

    Districts may not order multiple copies of the paper test to store until a student enrolls. Districts do not place OELPS paper test orders through the Test Information and Distribution Engine (TIDE); they contact the Department at the email address above.

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    What are the grade bands for the OELPS?
    The grade bands are Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grades 2-3, Grades 4-5, Grades 6-8 and Grades 9-12. The OELPS grade bands align with the grade bands in the Ohio English Language Proficiency Standards

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    In addition to the OELPS paper test, what special versions of the OELPS are available?

    Large-print and Braille versions are available. To order the OELPS paper test, large-print and Braille test booklets, districts contact statetests@education.ohio.gov. The vendor ships a general education-size test booklet with the large-print booklet and Braille test booklet to record each student’s responses. 

    Test administrators enter student responses for the paper, large-print and Braille versions in the Data Entry Interface (DEI) on the portal. 

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English Learner Identification

    What is the identification process for English learners?

    Under the Every Student Succeeds Act (2015), states adopted a standardized procedure to identify and exit English learners applicable in all public-school districts and community schools. Ohio began using the OELPS as part of its standardized procedure for identifying English learners in the 2018-2019 school year. School districts and community schools have a responsibility to identify English learners so they can provide instruction designed to help them use the English language and learn subject matter content at grade level. Ohio has a two-step process for identifying English learners.

    • Step One: Language Usage Survey
    • Step Two: OELPS based on interpretation of the responses to the Language Usage Survey.

    For students enrolled by the beginning of the school year, districts have 30 calendar days from the beginning of the school year to complete the identification and notification. Identification includes the Language Usage Survey and the OELPS. The notification includes a letter notifying the parents of the English learner student’s identification and placement in a language instruction educational program. If a student enrolls after the beginning of the school year, districts have 30 calendar days to complete the identification, plus an additional 15 calendar days to complete the notification.

    Please go to the document, Identifying English Learners in Ohio, for more detailed information.

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    Is the presumptive identification process available for the 2021-2022 school year?
    Because the Department anticipates that schools will be open for in-person learning for the 2021-2022 school year, the Department expects districts to follow the standardized English learner identification procedures rather than a presumptive identification process. Please go to the document, Identifying English Learners in Ohio, for more detailed information.

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Student Participation

    Who takes the OELPS?

    Districts administer the OELPS to potential English learners in grades K-12 identified by the family’s responses in the Language Usage Survey. Districts are required to administer the OELPS to newly enrolled students whose Language Usage Survey indicates the significant influence of language(s) other than English.
     
    Chartered nonpublic schools are not required to administer the OELPS but may do so at no charge. Chartered nonpublic schools that participate in the Title III grant program for English learners consult with the district to determine whether the OELPS or another screener will be used in the chartered nonpublic school’s program.
     
    Foreign exchange students should be considered for the two-step identification process just like any other student new to the district. Foreign exchange students have access to appropriate English learner accommodations only when identified as English learners. Foreign exchange students identified as English learners are required to take the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA) and any other state tests administered for the student’s grade level.
     

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    Is the OELPS administered to preschool students?
    No. The OELPS is administered to students who are enrolled in grades K-12. The OELPS was not designed for preschool students.

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    Is the OELPS administered to students who were screened and identified as English learners in preschool?
    Yes. Based on the results of the Language Usage Survey, the OELPS is required to identify students as English learners upon entry into kindergarten, regardless of identifications made during preschool.

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    Should the student who was identified through the presumptive identification process in school year 2020-2021 but was not administered the OELPS or OELPA be administered the OELPS in school year 2021-2022?
    Yes. The student should be administered the OELPS to confirm or refute the presumptive identification.

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    What are the consequences of students not taking the OELPS?
    The Ohio English Language Proficiency Screener (OELPS) is critical to the services schools must provide their English learners. In fact, federal education law requires all districts to administer a standardized English language proficiency screener to students identified as potential English learners. Students who are not administered the OELPS cannot be identified and reported as English learners. If students do not take the OELPS and are not identified as English learners, the students might not receive the English language services and accommodations needed.

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    If a student who was an English learner transfers from a different Ohio district or another state, must the district administer the OELPS?

    Ohio honors the previous district’s or state’s English learner identification and exit procedures. So long as student records indicate the student was an English learner and has not yet achieved English proficiency, the student could continue as an English learner in the new school without taking the OELPS. The new school may decide to administer a different English language proficiency screener to transfer students already identified as English learners to inform English learner program placement and services, but not for identification purposes.
    When transferring from another Ohio district or an out-of-state school, a student who has been identified as an English learner but did not meet the previous district’s or out-of-state school’s English learner exit criteria is an English learner in Ohio and the district does not need to screen. The student, however, is required to take the OELPA and other state tests applicable to the student’s grade level and the district reports the student as an English learner in Ohio Education Management Information System (EMIS) per the student’s transferred records.
    A student from another Ohio district or an out-of-state school who met the Ohio district’s or the previous state’s exit criteria is not an English learner in Ohio. The student is not screened with the OELPS and does not take the OELPA. Districts must monitor former English learners for persistent language barriers for a minimum of two years after exiting English learner status, regardless of the student’s enrollment when the student exited English learner status.

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    What should happen if the student’s records are incomplete or not sent at all by the previous school?
    The district must have documentation from another Ohio district or another state about the student’s English learner status. Districts may check the Centralized Reporting System (CRS), Ohio District Data Exchange (ODDEX) or contact statetests@education.ohio.gov as a last resort. If no documentation regarding the student’s English learner status is available, the district would follow Ohio’s English learner identification procedure.

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    Under what circumstances may a school re-administer the OELPS to students?

    A district may re-administer the OELPS to a student under limited circumstances:

    • The student returns to the school after an extended absence (a year or more).
    • The student exits from the English learner program and educators and/or the family notice the student may have persistent language barriers.
    • If the school administers the student the OELPS and the student is a nonparticipant, the school could re-administer the OELPS during the federal 30-day identification period when the school believes the student could participate in the OELPS.

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    What if the student’s available OELPA results indicate proficiency?
    If the student’s OELPA records indicate an overall performance level of Proficient, neither the OELPS nor the OELPA should be administered. The student is no longer an English learner, but should be monitored for persistent language difficulty. 

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    Is the screener only for new incoming students to our school or are we supposed to administer the OELPS to all current English learners and new students?

    Districts administer the OELPS to newly enrolled students who are potential English learners based on the results of the Language Usage Survey.
     
    If teachers observe or perceive a difficulty with English for a student who is not newly enrolled and has not been screened, the teacher could revisit the results of the Language Usage Survey and administer the OELPS after consultation with the family and school staff.

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Administration

    Can the OELPS be administered remotely?

    No. The OELPS administration requires one student and one test administrator testing in-person (no remote administration).

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    What is the structure of the OELPS administration?

    Districts administer the OELPS as a single test and not as four separate tests as is the OELPA. It is intended that districts administer the OELPS in one day. There may be extraordinary circumstances that cause a student’s test to be stopped. In these cases, the district would need Department approval to resume the test on another day by submitting a Test Status Request to reopen or reset the test in TIDE.
     
    The OELPS is arranged in three sections called steps. All steps include listening, reading, speaking and writing items. The three steps are:

    • Step One, or the Practice Test, familiarizes the student with the look and feel of the test and with the technological skills needed during the scored sections of the test; Step One is not scored;
    • Step Two identifies most students as English learners; test administrators score the constructed-response items from Step Two on the student’s device during the test sessions. The OELPS Step Two Speaking Scoring Document (scoring rubric) must be printed before beginning the OELPS; and
    • Step Three distinguishes between the overall levels of Proficient and Progressing; Step Three is scored after the student logs off; the test administrator must log in to the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) on the portal to access and score the student responses using the scoring rubrics.

    For more information about the three steps of the OELPS, please refer to OELPS Test Administration Manual.

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    What should a new OELPS test administrator do to prepare?
    The test administrator should start with the OELPS webpage to review general OELPS information. The test administrator must review the OELPS Test Administrator Manual and the Step Two Speaking Scoring Document before administering the OELPS. If the student progresses to Step Three of the OELPS, the test administrator must review the OELPS  Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) User Guide before scoring the student responses from Step Three.  There also is a Test Administrator Certification course available on the test portal.

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    What if the test administrator does not score the student responses in Step Three?
    The Centralized Reporting System (CRS) will not report results until the constructed-responses from Step Three are scored in the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS).

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    Does the test administrator score Step Three while the student is taking the OELPS?
    No, the student and the test administrator log out of the OELPS. The test administrator then logs in to the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) where the student responses and rubric for scoring are located. Refer to the OELPS Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) User Guide.

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    When is the OELPS available?
    The OELPS administration window typically is August through June. Check the Test Dates webpage for the specific dates for each school year. Districts may access the OELPS at any time throughout the school year. The OELPS closes for annual maintenance in July.
     
    Important dates for each assessment program also are listed on their respective test portals.

     

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    Is it necessary to register students who will take the OELPS in TIDE?
    Yes. The district must register or pre-identify in TIDE each student who will take the OELPS. Registration places the student’s SSID in the system and allows the student access to the test. Registration also allows the test administrator to configure the Student Test Settings and assessment accommodations, if applicable.
     
    Chartered nonpublic schools should contact statetests@education.ohio.gov to have
    Statewide Student Identifiers (SSID) assigned to their students. Additional information about SSIDs for students of chartered nonpublic schools can be found on the Documents and Forms page of the Department’s website.
     

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    Should the OELPS be administered before the KRA-R is administered?
    Yes. The student may be a potential English learner and may require an English language accommodation on the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment-Revised (KRA-R). Only students identified as an English learner through the OELPS may have English language accommodations.

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    Who can administer the OELPS?
    To administer the OELPS, the test administrator must
    1. Be an employee of the district; and
    2. Hold a current license, certificate or permit issued by the Ohio Department of Education.
    The license or certificate is not limited to a teaching license or certificate. While it is common for a licensed TESOL educator to administer the OELPS and OELPA, it is not a requirement.


     

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    What assistance may the test administrator give to the student?
    Students who cannot effectively navigate the online OELPS on their own because they lack the necessary skills or experience may have a trained test administrator assist with test navigation. For example, the test administrator may assist with the mouse, point-and-click, drag-and-drop and on-screen tools. The test administrator may assist only with the technology as indicated by the student and must not assist with answer selection. Influencing a student’s answer selection or response is a test security violation and will invalidate the assessment.
     
    On writing items where the student is to compose a written response, only students with a scribe documented on the IEP or 504 plan may have the test administrator type their handwritten responses into the online test. For students who are incapable of typing their own responses, see the “Scribe” non-embedded accommodations in the Accessibility Manual for Ohio’s English Language Proficiency Assessments.

     

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    How does the test administrator access the OELPS?
    The test administrator logs in to the TA Interface on the test portal to create a test session for the student. For more detailed instructions, please refer to the OELPS Test Administration Manual.
     

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    Must the OELPS be given to one student at one time?
    Yes, the student and test administrator work together during the Practice Test and the test administrator scores the speaking items in Step Two. The test administrator is physically present in the room with the student. Remote administration is not possible as it would be a potential test security threat. There is no group administration for any part of the OELPS.

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    How much time should a district or school schedule for the tests?
    Testing times vary based on student effort, ability and progress through the three steps of the screener. Districts should plan 30-60 minutes per student, though some students may require more or less time.
     

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    How can districts get help about administering the OELPS?
    Please contact the Ohio Help Desk at 1-877-237-7809 or by email at OHHelpDesk@cambiumassessment.com with questions about starting a test session and administering the OELPS. Questions on policy, procedures and test security should be directed to the Department at statetests@education.ohio.gov.

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Accessibility and Accommodations

    Are accommodations available for the OELPS?
    Yes, the Accessibility Manual for Ohio's English Language Proficiency Assessments addresses the English learner appropriate accommodations available to students taking the OELPS and the OELPA.

    Note: For students participating in Ohio’s State Tests of English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies, test administrators should refer to Ohio’s Accessibility Manual for information about accessibility and accommodations for students identified as English learners.  

     

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    Are translations of the OELPS available in languages other than English?
    No. Translations are not available. Students take the OELPS in English as this is an assessment of English language proficiency to identify English learners. Oral translation and word-to-word dictionaries are not permitted. However, general directions for the OELPS are available in Arabic and Spanish on the test portal.
     

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    What is domain exemption?
    Domain exemptions are available for the OELPS. Districts mark the domain exemption for each student through TIDE registration. The domain exemption must be marked prior to the start of the test. Please see the TIDE User Guide for instructions on manually editing or uploading test settings.  If the domain exemption is not marked prior to starting the OELPS, the domain(s) will not be exempted. The system will score the items and the student will receive a score.
     
    Districts may exempt students from up to three of the four domains on the OELPS if the student’s disability is such that the student cannot participate in the stated domain per the individualized education program (IEP) or 504 plan with existing English learner appropriate accommodations. The domain exemption must be documented on the IEP or 504 plan to be allowed. For example, English learners with hearing impairments could be exempt from taking the listening domain questions, and a nonverbal English learner could be exempt from taking the speaking domain questions. An English learner reading below grade level is still a reader and would not qualify for an exemption.
     
    A student’s overall proficiency level and identification as an English learner is based on the nonexempt domains. For example, if the students OELPS scores were Reading-4, Writing-5, Listening-Exempt, Speaking-Exempt, the student is at an overall proficiency level of Proficient and would not be identified as an English learner.
     
    Additional information about domain exemption is available in the Accessibility Manual for Ohio’s English Language Proficiency Assessments.
     

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Manuals

    What manuals and guidance are available for the OELPS?
    The Department posts OELPS manuals in the Resources section of the test portal. The table below describes the manuals, including when to review them and their contents.
    OELPS Resources
    RESOURCE WHEN TO REVIEW CONTENTS
    OELPS Test Administration Manual Before administering the OELPS. Policies and procedures for administering the OELPS.
    Screener Step Two Speaking Scoring Document Before administering the OELPS. Procedures, including rubrics, to score the speaking items in Step Two of the screener.
    Teacher Hand Scoring System User Guide Before administering the OELPS. Instructions for scoring students’ speaking and writing responses from Step Three of the screener. Test administrators score these items using the rubric in the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS). The THSS is located within the Centralized Reporting System.  
    Data Entry Interface User Guide for Paper Tests After students have completed a paper, large-print or Braille version of the screener. Instructions for entering student responses for the OELPS paper, large-print and Braille versions into the Data Entry Interface (DEI).
    Centralized Reporting System (CRS) resources:   After students have completed the screener, which is typically within three hours, the screener results are available. Instructions for accessing the  Centralized Reporting System (CRS) where the OELPS results are reported.

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Test Blueprint

    How many items are on the OELPS?
    The number of items varies depending on where the test stops the student, either Step Two or Step Three. The table explains the number of items per step.
    OELPS Number of Items per Step
    Segment Domains Number of Items Scoring Information
    Step One Listening
    Reading
    Speaking
    Writing
    7-10 items Not scored
    Step Two Listening
    Reading
    Speaking
    Writing
    22-25 items All items are scored.
     
    Four speaking items are scored during Step Two of the test by the test administrator.
    Step Three Listening
    Reading
    Speaking
    Writing
    18-23 items All items are scored.
     
    Kindergarten and Grade 1. Speaking items on the K and Grade 1 OELPS are hand-scored by the TA in the Teacher Hand Scoring System after student and TA log out of the test.
     
    Grades 2-12. Speaking and writing items on the Grade 2-12 OELPS are hand-scored by the TA in the Teacher Hand Scoring System  after the student and TA log out of the test.

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Practice Test

    Is an OELPS practice test available?
    There is no separate practice test for the OELPS. The practice test is part of the screener; it is Step One of the OELPS. While the practice test is not secure, it must not be copied or reproduced in any manner.
     
    For additional practice, students, families and test administrators may use the OELPA Practice Test to prepare for the OELPS as the item types and test delivery system are the same on both OELPS and OELPA. The OELPA Practice Test is a good way to become familiar with the look and feel of the online test.
     
    Test administrators should not practice the OELPS by logging into the screener using a false student name. This is a test security violation. Test administrators should practice in the Test Administrator (TA) Practice Site and Student Practice Site.

     

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Test Security

    What test security should be followed for the OELPS?
    The OELPS is a secure state test. Test administrators must follow test security protocol as established in Ohio law and rules.
     
    At all times, the district’s and the state’s written procedures for protecting secure test information must be followed. It is illegal and unethical for anyone to reproduce or disclose any of the test content or cause the content to be reproduced or disclosed in any format. The responsibility to maintain the security of the test questions continues even after the test concludes.
     
    Under Ohio law, releasing any test questions or other contents of a test or helping students cheat in any other way may result in an invalidation of test scores, termination of employment, suspension of certificates, licenses or permits and/or prosecution. Districts must ensure that students are aware of test security requirements and associated consequences. Violations of test security provisions in the district’s written procedures may also be punishable by penalties specified by the district.

     

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Scoring and Reporting

    How is the OELPS scored?
    Most OELPS items are scored by the online test delivery system; they are automatically “machine-scored” as the student completes each step of the OELPS. The OELPS constructed-response items (the student’s written and spoken responses) are scored locally by the districts.  When all items requiring hand-scoring have been scored, the scoring system merges the machine scores and hand scores for the overall proficiency level. Locally scoring the constructed-response items ensures more timely identification of English learners.
     
    For the OELPS paper form, large print and Braille, test administrators must enter the student responses in the Data Entry Interface (DEI).
     

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    How is it possible for a student to be below level 4 in speaking if they got a perfect score on the speaking questions?
    The OELPS uses a multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model in which all items contribute to the scores across all four domains. The items are weighted so that the items in that domain carry the most weight toward the score of that domain. For example, speaking items affect the speaking score most, but the speaking score also relies on the responses to items in the other three domains. All responses are counted when determining the scale score; the cut scores are based on the scale scores. This is one reason why there is no one-to-one correspondence between raw and scale scores within each domain.
     
    The speaking questions are easy for most students, so students often earn 7 or 8 raw score points out of 8 possible, even if they do poorly on the other domain items.
     

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    What is the process of the hand scoring constructed responses?
    The test administrator will score the student responses for the speaking items in Step Two immediately after the student submits their spoken responses. In Step Two, the test delivery system will ask the student to pass the device to the test administrator. The test administrator should monitor the student closely after submitting the speaking responses to ensure the student does not score their own responses. After the student has completed and reviewed items in Step Two, the computer compiles the hand scores and the machine scores to calculate the proficiency level to determine whether the student stops at the end of Step Two or goes on to Step Three. If the computer stops the student after Step Two, the student will be identified as an English learner and will log off.
     
    If the student has scored enough points to be eligible for the proficient level, the computer allows the student to move to Step Three and the next item appears. Once the student completes and reviews all items in Step Three, the student logs off. The test administrator does not score the student responses while the student completes Step Three. The test administrator will log in to the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) and score the student responses. The scoring rubrics for Step Three are not posted but are embedded in the THSS for the test administrator to use while scoring. After the test administrator submits the scores and logs off, the computer calculates the domain scores and proficiency level. Test administrators should review the OELPS Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) User Guide prior to scoring Step Three.
     

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    Are the constructed-response items in Step Three scored the same way as those in Step Two?
    No. The test administrator does not score the student responses in Step Three while the student is still taking the OELPS. Only in Step Two does the test administrator score the student responses while the student is taking the OELPS.
     
    After completing Step Three, the student logs off. Then the test administrator logs into the Teacher Hand Scoring System (THSS) and scores each student response. A username and password is required to enter the THSS. Refer to the THSS User Guide.

    If the test administrator does not score the student responses in the THSS, the student responses will remain in the system and no student results will be available. When the test administrator submits the scores and logs out of the THSS the results will be calculated and available in approximately three hours in the Centralized Reporting System (CRS).

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    When and where are OELPS scores reported?
    A student’s OELPS results are available in the Centralized Reporting System (CRS) approximately three hours after the completion of Step Two or Step Three. The Individual Student Report (ISR) may be printed from the CRS. The Department does not ship the Individual Student Reports to districts.

    Translated Individual Student Reports for OELPS Results are posted on the Department’s website. To notify English learner parents about their students’ achievements on the OELPS, districts may download the translations.
     

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    What are the performance levels for the OELPS?
    The four domains each receive a score from 1 to 5, with 5 being the most proficient level. The combination of the domain scores (or domain score profile) determines the student’s overall proficiency level. The table below describes the overall proficiency levels.
     
    Overall Proficiency Level Domain Scores
    Proficient All domain scores are 4s and/or 5s*
    Progressing A combination of scores that is not Proficient or Emerging
    Emerging All domain scores are 1s and/or 2s
     
    *Please note the proficiency definition for the OELPS-BK for the start of the school year through Dec. 31 is scores of 3s and higher in all nonexempt domains. The proficiency definition of 4s and higher is in place for the Kindergarten OELPS Jan. 1 through June 30.
     
    When reporting students’ English learner status in Ohio’s Education Management Information System (EMIS), “trial mainstream” classification is not determined by the OELPS scores. Only OELPA scores identify students in the trial mainstream.
     

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    What does the term “nonparticipant” mean for the OELPS?
    When a student does not engage with the test during the Practice Test (Step One), the test administrator may determine that the student is a nonparticipant. The district makes the decision for the nonparticipant designation, which identifies the student as an English learner. The district determines the overall performance level, either Emerging or Progressing, when the student does not participate. A student has participated in the OELPS if they have responded to at least one question.
     
    A student who responds in a native language, points to the screen, nods or shakes their head, blinks or makes a motion has made a response and is a participant and should move to Step Two. A student who makes absolutely no response is a nonparticipant. Detailed guidance about the required responses from the test administrator after Step One of the OELPS is available in the OELPS Test Administration Manual.
     
    In some cases, the district may decide to re-administer the OELPS to a nonparticipant at a later date, after the student has had time to acclimate to the new school and its staff.
     

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Technology

    Do students need earbuds, headphones or a microphone?
    Students may use a headset with headphones and a microphone; however, it is not required as the test is administered to students individually.  The student will need a microphone if the student’s testing device does not have a built-in microphone.
     

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    What testing system provides the OELPS? Is it the same as the other state tests system?
    Yes, the Department provides the same online system for the OELPS, the OELPA, Ohio’s State Tests (OST) and Alternate Assessment for Students with Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities (AASCD).
     

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    Is there specific information on the secure browser for the OELPS?
    Yes, please review the Secure Browser resources on the portal for specific information. The district’s Technology Coordinator may be helpful, too.
     

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Professional Development

Last Modified: 9/17/2021 1:11:37 PM