EMIS Glossary

EMIS Glossary

The purpose of the EMIS Glossary is to provide definitions for many of the terms and phrases encountered when working with and reporting EMIS data. This is not a comprehensive list of the language of EMIS. While the definitions of many of these terms can be found elsewhere on the Department's website, we have gathered them into this glossary in order to provide a central location for common EMIS terms.

You may use the alphabet below to go directly to the terms under any letter. The printer icon at the bottom of the page will allow you to print out a complete copy of this glossary.

If there is a term or phrase you think should be added to this glossary, submit your suggestion for consideration.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P
Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Alternate Assessment for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities (AASCD) This assessment allows students with significant cognitive disabilities to demonstrate their knowledge and skills using an appropriately rigorous assessment aligned to Ohio’s Learning Standards. 
Average daily membership (ADM) This is a headcount of public school students used as a measure with which to indicate the size of a school district in terms of enrollment and as the basis of state funding calculations.
 

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B

Board of Developmental Disabilities (BDD) These county-level organizations provide a range of interventions and programs for students with developmental disabilities.

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C

Career-Based Intervention (CBI) A career-tech program for Grade 7-12 students who are ages 12-21 and identified as disadvantaged (academically, economically, or both) and having barriers to achieving academic and career success.
Career-technical education (CTE) Education methodology and strategies to prepare students for careers as well as continued education. Within career tech are foundation classes and workforce development programs.
College Credit Plus (CCP) Ohio’s College Credit Plus helps students earn college and high school credits at the same time by taking college courses from community colleges or universities. The purpose of this program is to promote rigorous academic pursuits and to provide a wide variety of options to college-ready students. 
Career-technical planning district (CTPD) Responsible for coordinating career-technical education options for students within the CTPD. All school districts and community schools are required to be part of a CTPD to ensure their students have access to career-technical education options.
Comprehensive Continuous Improvements Plans (CCIP) The Department’s e-grants system, a unified grants application, verification, and payment system that consists of two parts: the Planning Tool and the Funding Application.
Comma separated values (CSV) Files that contain plain text data sets separated by commas. Each row in the CSV file represents a different row in the database. CSV files are used to transfer data between databases or to open a dataset within a spreadsheet for review.
Community eligibility provision (CEP) A provision that helps schools and districts in high poverty communities meet eligibility to serve no-cost lunches and breakfasts to all their students.
Community school average daily membership (CSADM) This is a count of community school students used as a measure with which to indicate the size of a school in terms of enrollment and as the basis of state funding calculations.
Connected Ohio Records for Educators (CORE) A suite of 18 Web applications that address all aspects of an educator's qualifications, including licensure, educator residency, professional conduct and much more.
Corrective Action Plan (CAP) A step-by-step plan of action to resolve findings from fiscal or programmatic reviews.

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D

Data collector (DC) Allows both districts and regional sites to manage the EMIS reporting process. The Data Collector allows users to collect and review data and validation reports and submit their data to the Department.
Department of Youth Services (DYS) The administrative department of the Ohio state government responsible for juvenile corrections.
District of residence (DOR) School district in which the parent of the child resides unless the child attends a community school then the community school becomes the district of residence. See OAC Rule 3301-51- 01 (B) (56).
District of service (DOS) The district the child attends to receive services if the child does not attend their district of residence. See OAC Rule 3301-51-01 (A) (3).
Dropout Prevention and Recovery (DPR) In accordance with Ohio Administrative Code 3301-102-10, a dropout prevention and recovery school is one to which any of the following applies: any community school that operates a drug recovery program in cooperation with a court; any community school in which the majority of students are enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program operated by the school; or a conversion community school whose sponsoring district has received a waiver from having the school's academic data rolled up into the district's Ohio School Report Card because the school primarily enrolls students between 16 and 22 years of age who dropped out of high school or are at risk of dropping out of high school due to poor attendance, disciplinary problems or suspensions.

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E

Early Learning and School Readiness (ELSR) Children's experiences from birth to kindergarten entry, which include developmental areas of language, social-emotional, cognition and knowledge, approaches toward learning and physical well-being.  
Education Management Information System (EMIS) Statewide data collection system for Ohio's primary and secondary schools in accordance with Ohio Revised Code 3301.0714. 
Education Monetary Assistance Distribution (EMAD) A source for determining whether a student’s family is receiving public assistance.
Educational Service Center (ESC) Regional centers dedicated to providing Ohio school districts with professional development, technology, support, planning and administrative services that help improve student learning, enhance the quality of instruction, expand equitable access to resources and maximize operating and fiscal efficiencies.
End-of-course (EOC) tests Academic assessments given for certain high school core subjects. The end-of-course tests are part of Ohio’s graduation requirements.
Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) The reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Passed in 2015, this bipartisan measure replaces the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. ESSA represents a shift from broad federal oversight of primary and secondary education to greater flexibility and decision-making at the state and local levels. 

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F

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The federal law that protects the privacy of student education records.
Federal Low-Income Counting System (FLICS) A web application that allows both community schools and traditional public districts to review economically disadvantaged community school student data from the School Options Enrollment System (SOES) module, which is part of ODDEX.
Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) Both federal and state laws require that every student with a disability receive a free and appropriate public education (FAPE).
Full-time equivalent (FTE) A way of standardizing the number of hours students attend school--or employees work--per day across districts so that comparisons can be made more easily. For example, each student attending school on a school's regular all day, every day calendar counts as 1 FTE. This way, a full-time student attending a district with a 5 hour school day will count the same as a full-time student attending a district with a 5.5 hour school day.

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H

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) This federal law provides for the privacy and security of each individual's health information.

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I

Individualized education plan (IEP) A plan or program developed to ensure a child who has a disability identified under the law receives specialized instruction and related services. It is developed by a team that includes key school staff and the child’s parents.
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) A federal law that provides rights and protections to children with disabilities and their parents. It requires schools to provide services to meet the educational needs of eligible students with disabilities.
Information retrieval number (IRN) The unique identifier assigned to every district and school building.
Information technology center (ITC) ITCs provide IT shared services to Ohio K-12 districts. They offer services including accounting, payroll, library automation, EMIS, network management, student information systems, video, remote distance learning, electronic resources, computerized grade book, parental access, web conferencing, Internet access, web and email filtering, firewall and web security, telephony, web hosting, server hosting, and data-driven decision support.

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J

Joint vocational school (JVS) Often referred to as “career centers,” these schools provide a variety of career-technical education options for students and may provide academic courses.
Joint vocational school district (JVSD) Each JVSD serves an area consisting of adjacent school districts in one or more counties and is governed by a joint vocational school board consisting of representatives from the member districts. A JVSD is funded in part through tax levies in all participating counties. Generally, the JVSD provides the majority of the career-technical education programming in a dedicated career-technical education-focused building, as well as in member traditional and/or community schools.
Juvenile detention center (JDC) Serve as a facility for the temporary care of individuals under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, alleged to be delinquent, or who are pending court adjudication, or disposition or as a result of a juvenile sentence for a defined term.

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K

Kindergarten readiness assessment (KRA) An assessment tool that measures a child’s readiness for engaging with kindergarten instruction.

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L

Least restrictive environment (LRE)

The environment where the child with a disability receives an appropriate education designed to meet his or her special educational needs, while still being educated with nondisabled peers to the maximum extent appropriate. The removal of a child with a disability from the general education environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability 

is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved appropriately. 
Local classroom code (LCC) The code used by the local school district that uniquely identifies a specific classroom (i.e., period and section) within a district.
Local education agency (LEA) A public board of education or other public authority legally constituted within a state to either provide administrative control, direction or service functions for public schools.
Local report card (LRC) The local report cards give your community a clear picture of the progress of your district and schools in raising achievement and preparing students for the future. They also include a performance management section users can access by clicking the “Financial Data” button at the top of each report card. The information measures district and school performance in the areas most critical to success in learning, as well as information on academic and financial performance metrics. Ohio School Report Cards data shows educators, school administrators and families where their schools are succeeding as well as areas where they need to improve.
Longitudinal graduation rate (LGR) The percentage of students from a class of beginning ninth graders who graduate by their anticipated graduation date (or in 5 years, 6 years, etc.). Longitudinal rates are always calculated by "cohort", or group of students who began ninth grade the same year.

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N

No Child Left Behind (NCLB) The main law for K–12 general education in the United States from 2002–2015. The law held schools accountable for how student learning and achievement. 

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O

Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) A codification of the rules of the administrative agencies of the state.
Ohio Association of EMIS Professionals (OAEP) A not-for-profit organization dedicated to learning, using, and sharing the best methods of the professionals responsible for the reporting of school district data.
Ohio District Data Exchange (ODDEX) An application that gives districts additional tools to review their data. Through ODDEX, districts can access a number of applications, including, but not limited to, Student Cross Reference (SCR), School Options Enrollment System (SOES), College Credit Plus (CCP).
Ohio Education Data Systems Association (OEDSA) Serves as the "voice of computer usage in Ohio education" and to provide a common professional organization which would facilitate the communication of information relative to data processing within the administrative offices.
Ohio Education Directory System (OEDS) A directory data system in which organizations maintain their own data. The general public can search OEDS for the most current information about an organization.
Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA) An English language proficiency test composed of four domains (tests): listening, reading, writing, and speaking. It measure a student’s English skills in the four language domains.
Ohio Graduation Test An assessment designed to ensure students receiving a high school diploma demonstrate high levels of academic achievement and meet federal requirements for high school testing. Ohio’s high school end-of-course tests replaced the OGT. 
Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Laws of the state of Ohio consolidated into general provisions, titles, and chapters.
Ohio State School for the Blind (OSSB) A publicly funded educational facility dedicated to the intellectual, social, physical, and emotional growth of all students with visual impairments.
Ohio School for the Deaf (OSD) An educational facility and resource center on deafness that provides comprehensive education for Ohio's deaf and hard-of-hearing students that encourages independence and life long learning.
Ohio’s State Tests (OST) These tests evaluate how well our students are growing in the knowledge and skills outlined in Ohio’s Learning Standards. These tests help guide and strengthen future teaching to prepare students for long-term success in school, college, careers and life. Test results also allow citizens to know how their local schools are performing compared to others around the state.

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P

Performance index A measure on Ohio’s School Report Cards, as part of the Achievement Component. The Performance Index measures the achievement of every student, not just whether or not they reach “proficient.” Districts and schools receive points for every student’s level of achievement. The higher the student’s level, the more points the school earns toward its index.
Preschool special education (PSE) In Ohio, preschool special education is for three- to five-year old children with disabilities. The Office of Early Learning and School Readiness aims for families, preschool staff, and the community to work together to meet the needs of young children with disabilities. To meet individual children’s needs, districts offer a variety of preschool special education services. Children with disabilities may receive services in public schools, private preschools, or child-care centers.

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R

Reading Achievement Plan (RAP)

A district’s plan for raising student achievement in reading. Ohio law (Ohio Revised Code 3301.0710) requires each school district or community school that meets the following criteria, as reported on the past two consecutive report cards issued for that district or community school, to submit to the Ohio Department of Education a Reading Achievement Plan by Dec. 31: 

  1. The district or community school received a grade of “D” or “F” on the Improving At-Risk K-3 Readers Measure; and 
  2. Fewer than 60 percent of the district’s or community school’s students scored proficient or higher on the state’s grade 3 English language arts test.
Reading Improvement and Monitoring Plan (RIMP) Ohio Revised Code 3313.608 states a school must create a reading improvement and monitoring plan for a student who is not on track (reading below grade level) within 60 days of receiving the reading diagnostic results. The district must involve the student’s parent or guardian and the classroom teacher in developing the plan. Reading improvement and monitoring plans allow teachers and parents to work together to understand the student’s reading deficiency and outline reading instruction and supports. The instructional services selected for a student on a reading improvement and monitoring plan rely on the judgment of the student’s teachers and parents.

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S

Schools interoperability framework (SIF) Provides true data interoperability and integration from the smallest school district to the largest state education agency.
School Options Enrollment System (SOES) Community schools enter data concerning the enrollment and attendance of their students in the Education Management Information System (EMIS). EMIS data populates the Ohio District Data Exchange System’s (ODDEX) School Options Enrollment System (SOES). The Ohio Department of Education uses SOES data to inform public districts about their students who are enrolled in community schools.
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) STEM education is an approach to learning where rigorous academic concepts are coupled with real-world lessons as students apply science, technology, engineering and mathematics in contexts that make connections between school, community and work. 
Secure data center (SDC) Interactive, quality assurance tool for districts and community schools to check that the data they reported in EMIS is accurate and complete. The SDC shows data associated with many measures on the Ohio School Report Cards, which enables districts and community schools to drill into and see the results of calculations in real time. Multiple historical reports also are available that allow users to view past data and trends. Access to the SDC is role-based behind SAFE, so a district or community school can only see its own data. 
Security Application for Enterprise (SAFE) The Department’s secure web portal account individuals use to register for professional development, report student data, or provide information about a specific school district. 
State Improvement Grant (SIG) Federal funding that was eliminated with ESSA. Funding is still awarded through 2020-2021; however, no new grants will be awarded.
State Software Development Team (SSDT) Under the direction and support of the ODE Information Management Services, the State Software Development Team (SSDT) develops and maintains state software packages.
Statewide student identifier (SSID) A student identification number is assigned to all 1.7 million K-12 public school children in the state in accordance with Ohio Revised Code 3301.0714. 
Student Cross Reference (SCR) Allows districts to track student enrollment across districts. The SCR is populated with data collected through the Student Cross Reference Collection Request. The SCR includes basic demographic data and can be used by EMIS reporting entities to verify enrollment for funding. It is part of ODDEX.
Student information system (SIS) Data originate at the school district or EMIS reporting entity and each entity may choose to report data using any student information software (SIS) of their preference. However, EMIS data is to be reported and submitted according to the data definitions, requirements and rules as instructed in the EMIS Manual.
System to Achieve Results for Students (STARS) A web-based application that provides for planning and management of professional development and technical assistance programs for Ohio educators

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T

Test information distribution engine (TIDE) Stores student demographic information and provides authorized users with tools for administrative tasks. 
Third Grade Reading Guarantee (TGRG) A portfolio of projects to support districts in identifying students from kindergarten through grade 3 who are struggling in reading and providing evidence-based intensive support to lead to proficiency (Ohio Revised Code 3313.608, 301.0710). 

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U

Uniform School Accounting System (USAS) Used to process and track the accounting activity within a school district. The criteria used for the system's design are those set forth by the Auditor of the State of Ohio.
Uniform School Payroll System (USPS) Used for running payrolls in school districts.

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W

Written acceleration plan (WAP)

Districts must provide all students recommended for acceleration with a Written Acceleration Plan (WAP). The WAP describes the transition plan and supports for the successful implementation of an acceleration. After the successful completion of the transition period established in the WAP, an acceleration becomes a permanent placement.
Written education plan (WEP) All school districts in Ohio reporting services to gifted students must have on file a copy of a Written Education Plan (WEP) for each student served. Ohio Administrative Code 3301-51-15 outlines the specific points that must be included on the WEP.

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Important EMIS Links

Last Modified: 7/31/2019 1:12:39 PM