Progress Component

The Progress component looks closely at the growth that all students are making based on their past performances.


Why?

We know that not all children start out at the same place with their learning, but every student should learn and grow throughout the school year. The Progress component of the report card looks closely at the growth that all students are making based on their past performances.

Students in a school may score low in achievement on their state tests in a given year, but this does not mean they are not learning. There may be a great number of students with disabilities and students with low academic performance who are still building new knowledge and skills. The Progress component shows that growth, or progress.

At the same time, many people believe that high achievers, such as gifted students, have learned all they can in a grade and can’t make additional progress. But families should always expect their children to grow in knowledge throughout each school year. The Progress component gives teachers and schools credit for adjusting their teaching to help all students learn more, whatever level of knowledge and skill they possessed when the school year began.

There are four measures within the component:

  1. Progress for all students in the school together;
  2. Progress for gifted students;
  3. Progress for students with disabilities; and
  4. Progress for students whose academic performance is in the lowest 20 percent of students statewide.

What’s new this year?

Progress measures have previously been based on state test results in math and English language arts in grades 4-8. This year, the Progress measures add state tests in grades 5-8 science and grade 6 social studies as well as math and English language arts end-of course high school exams.

Also, for the first time on this report card, schools and districts are receiving letter grades on the larger Progress component of which these measures are a part.

How is the Progress grade for your school or district determined?

The state examines students’ state tests through a series of calculations to produce a “value-added” rating for your school or district for each of the four groups listed at left.

The grade gives the most weight for progress of all students in a school. If your school or district has enough students in the other three groups to count toward a grade, the grades for these three groups all receive equal weight. If your school or district does not have enough in one or more of these three groups, the calculation is adjusted.

Expected growth by a student group gives the school or district a C grade. A group that has made more than expected growth in a school year earns the school or district an A or B grade, depending on the amount of growth. A student group that has made less than expected growth in a school year results in a D or F grade for the school or district.


Resources

Last Modified: 7/21/2016 12:06:42 PM