ExtraCredit, the official blog of the Ohio Department of Education, offers commentary and insight on a wide range of education issues from department experts and guest bloggers from throughout Ohio’s schools and support organizations. We encourage your ideas, feedback and comments to promote a two-way dialogue. See our Comment Policy for more information.

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Preparing Ohio Students for Future Success After Graduation

By: Carolyn George

How is the high school experience changing for today’s youth? With so many evolving efforts, it is difficult to keep up with everything, let alone continue to connect the dots that you have been collecting the last few years. In a series of posts, we will review the incredible efforts underway to create substantive changes to Ohio’s K-12 education system through policies around graduation options, dual enrollment and credential attainment. In this post, we will focus on the importance of graduation and preparing students for future success.

The Office of College and Career Success and Marion Harding High School are reshaping education to ensure that students graduate with the skills needed to succeed after high school.

The opportunity we face is preparing young people to address the challenges that await them after high school graduation. Fresh in your mind is the class of 2016, with graduates who are embarking on their post-secondary ventures, or so we hope. Right? We graduated them on to the next thing, but are they really prepared, or as we have coined the term, “college and career ready”? What have we graduated them to and how will we know all of the hard work from kindergarten through senior year was the right work to help them transition to their chosen destinations (i.e., colleges, careers, apprenticeships, military)? Unless you are Marion City Schools, it is not likely that you are reflecting upon post-graduation data that really sheds light on your community’s economy and the greatest resource, which is the future workforce.

In K-12 education, we measure success based on the student earning a high school diploma. In today’s economy, it takes more than a high school diploma to prepare for a living wage occupation. Ohio is at a pivotal point in changing the educational paradigm. The growing pains you are feeling now are overdue and represent the economic shift experienced in Ohio and across the country since 2008. The tremendous need to personalize learning, expand curriculum options and broaden access are not only necessary, they are critical to sustaining economies and truly preparing the next generation for gainful employment. However, this is not just a high school initiative. It is imperative that the entire K-12 system transform.

So you are asking yourself, how does kindergarten readiness and the Third Grade Reading Guarantee affect small business development? The livelihood of communities depends on high-quality K-12 education, not just for preparing students within an effective system but for attracting business and retaining talent. When companies know that K-12 education is of high quality, they will see the community as adding value to the lives of their employees, which provides leverage for attracting talent. Likewise, the students graduating from area high schools ready to excel in college and careers provide a talented future workforce and create local growth potential.

Knowing how education and business work together is part of the puzzle, but there is so much more to creating thriving career pathway options for students. In my next post, we will dive into the transformational efforts taking place through graduation options, dual enrollment and credential attainment. Until then, I will leave you with this — if students simply graduate high school without completing a college or career ready curriculum, what pathways are they truly prepared to pursue?

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Teachers, Rejuvenate (Yourself and Your Practice) This Summer!

By: Virginia Ressa

Summer vacations are underway across the state. As teachers, we all look forward to summer as a time to relax and rejuvenate after the hard work of a long school year. Summer is our well-earned time to take care of ourselves. Each summer, I planned to read the books piling up on my nightstand, complete unfinished projects and set aside time to spend with my family — all things I didn’t have the energy for during the school year. Rest and rejuvenation are important for keeping ourselves physically and emotionally healthy.

This summer, in addition to taking a break to rejuvenate yourself, consider carving off time to rejuvenate your practice. During the school year, it is difficult to take time to reflect on our work and consider how we might strengthen our practice. This is the time when we can step back and reflect on what worked well and what we want to improve, without the pressure of the day-to-day responsibilities of the classroom. Here are some suggestions and resources to help you think about your practice this summer:

  • Read a book. While I know you want to read some books just for fun, I also encourage you to read something that will help rejuvenate your practice. There are so many books to choose from that it can be overwhelming. Check out this list of recommendations from EdWeek to help narrow down your choices.
  • Learn more about best practices. Visit the What Works Clearinghouse, which highlights the most effective research-based instructional practices. These guides and quick reviews are easy to read and can spur new thinking without taking too much of your time.
  • Prepare for your diverse classroom. As you reflect on the past school year, start looking ahead and consider new ways you can meet the different needs of all types of learners in your class. I’ve been learning more about Universal Design for Learning and how it can help us plan ahead for all students rather than retrofitting lessons to meet student needs. I encourage you to take a few minutes to review the guidelines from CAST and the many resources available from the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence
  • See what other teachers are doing. On the Teaching Channel, you will find classroom videos on topics we all struggle with, such as assessment, engagement, differentiation, feedback and more. You also can see Ohio teachers and students implementing Formative Instructional Practices in the FIP Video Library
  • Share ideas on Pinterest. I know a lot of us love clicking through Pinterest for decorating and craft ideas, but the site is also full of boards sharing great ideas for meeting student needs, organizing data and responding to evidence of student learning. Create your own board to collect the ideas you want to try with your students.
  • Sign up to receive updates from the Ohio Department of Education. You can sign up to receive regular updates on the topics that interest you most. This is an easy way to stay informed as new laws are implemented and opportunities become available for teachers and community members to provide input and feedback.

See how Mrs. Susie’s 4th graders are using formative instructional practices at Beechwood Elementary School

I know how hard teachers work throughout the year and how important it is to take time to rest and focus on yourself for a while. Take time to read a book just for fun! Stay up late and watch your favorite shows! Then, take some time to engage in professional learning while your head is clear and you aren’t rushed. It will help you to rejuvenate your practice for the new school year and revitalize your enthusiasm for your work.


Virginia Ressa is an education program specialist at the Ohio Department of Education, where she focuses on helping schools and educators meet the needs of diverse learners through professional learning. You can learn more about Virginia by clicking here.

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Welcome to ExtraCredit, our new, official blog! Join in on the conversation!

By: Guest Blogger

Welcome to ExtraCredit, the official blog of the Ohio Department of Education! This is a new space where we will share weekly blog posts on a variety of education issues by department experts and guest bloggers from throughout Ohio’s schools and support organizations.

We want to start a two-way dialogue between the department and educators, parents and the public about what’s going on in education. It’s a chance to relax our style, share more anecdotal information and show the human side to education — from the state level all the way down to the student. 

We’re excited to get this underway and would love to hear your ideas. Is there an Ohio education blogger you’d like to see make a guest appearance? What topics would you like to see from department experts? We’d love your feedback. Post a comment below (see our comment policy) or email us your thoughts.

Our first post will be published early next week, so keep an eye out and jump into the conversation. Thanks for joining in!

— All of us at the Ohio Department of Education

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